Profile L2 - Double DEC in Science + ALC

Prior Spanish credited after writing a placement test and a test for credit

General Education Courses

603-101-MQIntroduction to College English

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-4

This course will provide the student with the opportunity to make an intensive analysis of short fiction in order to see how it functions as a means of commenting upon human behavior and experience. Specifically, the student will examine such basic concepts of fiction as plot, character, setting, tone, atmosphere, point-of-view and theme. The student will be expected to produce written work and to take part in class discussion. To this end, students should learn to recognize the appropriate use of words, correct syntactical usage, and the coherent development of ideas; students should further learn to develop their own ideas into arguments and theses, to organize them and to edit the final copy.

First Required French Course

Weighting: Depends on the level (see each level below)

Your Sec. IV written French mark will determine into which level you will be placed.

Fall semester

602-100-MQFrançais de base

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Ce cours élémentaire de français s'adresse aux élèves qui n'ont aucune connaissance du français. Il a pour but d'aider l'élève à acquérir et à appliquer les notions de base de la communication orale et écrite en français courant. On y fait de la grammaire, du vocabulaire, de la conversation, des laboratoires de langue, de la lecture et de l'écriture.

602-101-MQLangue française et communication

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Ce cours permettra à l'élève rendu à ce niveau d'apprendre à communiquer en français avec une certaine aisance. Plus particulièrement, le cours vise l'acquisition d'habiletés de production (parler et écrire) et d'habiletés de compréhension (écouter et lire) par le biais d'activités de communication orales et écrites.

602-102-MQLangue française et culture

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Ce cours permettra à l'étudiant de comprendre les composantes essentielles d'oeuvres littéraires appartenant à différents genres (narratif, dramatique et poétique). L'étudiant développera, de façon plus particulière, ses capacités d'analyse et de rédaction, et acquerra les connaissances nécessaires pour produire une bonne analyse littéraire. Chaque oeuvre étudiée en classe permettra à l'étudiant de saisir l'importance des caractéristiques formelles, d'valuer leurs impacts sur le sens de l'oeuvre et d'en rendre compte dans un texte d'analyse d'environ 450 mots. De plus, une révision de certaines difficultés de la grammaire française amènera l'étudiant à mieux maîtriser la langue dans ses analyses.

602-103-MQCulture française et littérature

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra à l'étudiant de traiter d'un sujet culturel ou littéraire en se servant d'ouvrages littéraires et de référence. L'étudiant développera plus particulièrement ses capacités générales d'analyse textuelle et de rédaction et devra en rendre compte dans une analyse complète de 550 mots.

602-900-LWLittérature d'expression française

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra à l'étudiant de s'initier au vaste corpus de la littérature d'expression française du XXème siècle. Plus particulièrement, il sera amené à découvrir l'univers de grands écrivains de la littérature produite en France et au Québec et sera appelé à situer plusieurs oeuvres dans leur contexte socio-historique et culturel afin de réfléchir aux thèmes développés par les auteurs. De plus, l'étudiant acquerra des connaissances sur les mouvements littéraires auxquels correspondent les oeuvres mises à l'étude.

Physical Activity and Effectiveness

Weighting: 0-2-1

This course is given as an introductory course to a chosen physical activity (see the list below). Students are called upon to evaluate their abilities and attitudes while practicing the physical activity of their choice, to apply and respect the rules and safety guidelines of the physical activity, to set objectives, and to interpret their progress during the course. Students are expected to experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills and attitudes required by the activity. 

109-102-A4Adapted Personalized Fitness & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

This course is designed for students who are unable to follow the regular courses offered by the Physical education Department due to medical limitations. These special needs students must provide appropriate medical documents to register for this course. Alternative personal training strategies adapted to student needs and capacities will be examined on an individual basis with the course professor. Students will evaluate their attitudes and skills, observe rules, apply safety guidelines, set objectives and interpret their progress during the course. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills, fitness levels and attitudes specific to their personalized physical activity program. Cardiovascular fitness assessment (V02Max) may be included in this course. Course fee: Exempt. Equipment: Students are expected to wear workout clothing, running shoes and asked to supply their personal towel and water bottle when working out the fitness centre.

109-102-B4Aerobic Dance & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Students will evaluate their attitudes and skills, observe rules, apply safety guidelines, set objectives and interpret their progress during the course. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills, fitness levels and attitudes specific to the activity. A variety of aerobic dance, step and floor routines tailored to music will be planned in an effort to expose students to a wide range of cardiovascular and muscular fitness exercises. Students will be asked to build a routine and present it for a thematic Halloween activity. Muscular and cardiovascular (V02Max) fitness assessments will be included in this course. Courses will be held in the campus gymnasium. Course fee: Exempt. Equipment: Students are expected to wear workout clothing, running shoes and asked to supply their personal towel and water bottle when working out in the fitness centre. 

109-102-D4Badminton & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Students will evaluate their attitudes and skills, observe rules, apply safety guidelines, set objectives and interpret their progress during the course. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills, fitness levels and attitudes specific to the activity. Cardiovascular fitness assessments (V02Max) will be included in this course. Badminton skills, including serve, smash, clears, drop shots and footwork will be examined during the course. Students will also receive instruction on rules, equipment selection, tournament set-ups, tactical attacking and defending strategies. Courses are held in the campus gymnasium and occasionally in the fitness center to assess sport specific fitness requirements. Course fee: Exempt. Equipment: Students are expected to wear workout clothing, court or multipurpose cross training shoes. All racquets and badminton shuttles will be provided for the course.

109-102-E4Basketball & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Students will evaluate their attitudes and skills, observe rules, apply safety guidelines, set objectives and interpret their progress during the course. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills, fitness levels and attitudes specific to the activity. Cardiovascular fitness assessments (V02Max) will be included in this course. Basic skills such as dribbling, passing, shooting, man-to-man defense, rebounding and footwork will be examined during the course. Students will also receive instruction on rules, equipment selection, tactical attacking and defending strategies. Courses are held in the campus gymnasium and occasionally in the fitness center to assess sport specific fitness requirements. Course fee: Exempt. Equipment: Students are expected to wear workout clothing, court or multipurpose shoes.

109-102-J4Volleyball & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Students will evaluate their attitudes and skills, observe rules, apply safety guidelines, set objectives and interpret their progress during the course. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills, fitness levels and attitudes specific to the activity. Cardiovascular fitness assessments (V02Max) will be included in this course. Basic skills such as serving, setting, defensive receptions, spiking, and blocking will be examined during the course. Students will also receive instruction on rules, tournament set ups, offensive attacking systems as well as defensive systems. Modified games are used to build-up to playing the six-player game effectively. Courses are held in the campus gymnasium and occasionally in the fitness center to assess sport specific fitness requirements. Course fee: Exempt. Equipment: Students are expected to wear workout clothing, court or multipurpose shoes.

109-102-N4Golf Intensive

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Students will evaluate their attitudes and skills, observe rules, apply safety guidelines, set objectives and interpret their progress during the course. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills, fitness levels and attitudes specific to the activity. Cardiovascular fitness assessments (V02Max) will be included in this course. Introductory instructional session will be held early in the semester at the Peps driving range in late August and early September. Several outings will be held at Golf Metropolitain. Courses are held in the campus gymnasium and occasionally in the fitness center to assess sport specific fitness requirements Course schedule: Course outing dates may vary according to weather and sunset times late in the semester from 3 PM to sunset.* Consult the course calendar for outing dates and times. Classes last three hours and missing one weekly class may lead to an automatic failure in this course. Course fee: $130*  (*subject to change). The fee must paid when you accept the final version of your schedule. Course registration fee includes green fees, transportation and driving range practice activities. Equipment: Clubs are provided by the college. Students may use their personal equipment. Golf balls and tees must be provided by students during courses offered at Golf Métropolitain. Reimbursement policy: Equipment rental and other financial arrangements must be made in advance to prepare this course, consequently students not able to attend the class outings will not be reimbursed and may receive an automatic failure. 

109-102-P4Tennis & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Tennis courses are held at the Laval University outdoor tennis court facility, East of the PEPS. Courses are held from 10:20 to 12:05 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays from August to the first week of October. Students will meet in the gymnasium for their first class. Courses may be modified due to weather conditions. Make sure to check with your teacher in room 281 before going to the tennis courts when weather conditions are questionable. For inclement weather conditions, students will meet in room 135 or 281 for theory or conditioning as determined by the teacher. Equipment: Rackets and balls are provided for this course. Students may choose to use their personal equipment for this course. Questions and information: 

109-102-Q4Spinning & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Courses are held in the campus gymnasium and occasionally in the fitness center to assess sport specific fitness requirements Cardiovascular fitness assessments (V02Max) will be included in this course. Cycling technique, pace, r.p.m., sizing and bike adjustments are presented by the instructor in an effort to impact on lifetime cycling pursuits. The instructor presents a variety of cycling routines designed to develop the three basic energy systems that contribute to the development of cardiovascular fitness. The instructor will introduce students to specific exercise programs that promote core stability, flexibility and muscular fitness. Students will be exposed to cycling equipment selection, hydration and nutrition strategies as well as road bike safety concepts. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and. Courses will be held in room 135 (fitness center). Course fee: Exempt. Equipment: Students are expected to wear cycling pants or shorts and avoid long lose fitting pants that may be a source of injury while spinning. Some spinners are equipped with clip pedals. Students may provide personal footwear (clip shoes) or multipurpose training shoe. Students must supply their personal towel and water bottle when working out the fitness centre at all times.

109-102-T4Mountain Biking Intensive

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Four (4) intensive outdoor adventure workshops and activity learning sessions will take place once a week over the course of five (5) or six (6)* weeks. The city of Quebec is a wonderful playground for mountain bikers and is surrounded by five (5) major mountain bike centers. Three (3) of them will be visited during this course. The basic riding techniques of braking, pedaling, shifting, balancing, pop wheelie/bunny hopping, turning, “pumping”, climbing and descending as well as individual and group riding safety guidelines, trail and obstacle reading and route planning as on-trail bike repair and bike maintenance will be explored to ensure that the students can enjoy riding in beginner to intermediate level mtb trails in a safe environment. A few courses will be held in room 135 (fitness center) and occasionally in room 281 according to the course calendar.

All students must attend the mandatory preparation class during the 1st week of the fall semester in order to qualify for this course. Students not able to attend this class will be replaced by students on the class waiting list. The preparation course will be held in room 281.

 

Course outing dates:  

For all outings, departure time from school will be 2pm sharp. Arrival back at school will be at around 7pm.

August 25: Mont Sainte-Anne

September 8: Vallee Bras-du-Nord, Shannahan sector

September 15: Vallee Bras-du-Nord, Mont Laura and “Le Suisse” sector.

September 22: Back at Mont Ste-Anne.

September 29: buffer date to make up for cancelled trip due to bad weather.

 

Course fee includes transportation to and from riding sites, a quality mountain bike rental* and daily access fees.

Cost: 160$.  Must pay when you accept the final version of your schedule.

 

*Students are not allowed to bring their own bicycle in the bus to and from riding site. Students who want to use their personal bicycle will have to send their request to the teacher at least one week ahead of time. The students who request the use of their personal bicycle will have to undergo a mechanical inspection by the teacher at school. The teacher may accept the request upon inspection conclusion or may require that the bike be inspected and/or repaired by a professional mechanic if the bicycle is judged to be in poor working order and unsafe to be ridden off-road. Students who would be allowed to use their own bike during the outings will have to take care of their own mean of transportation. Course fee will remain. No exceptions.

 

Equipment:

Mandatory equipment: a quality mountain bike that is in good working order, bike helmet, cycling gloves, glasses, backpack and 2 water bottles or a hydration pack, 1 lunch and 2 snacks, clothes that are adapted to the temperature and weather conditions, cycling specific or outdoor shoes that the student will not bother getting dirty, changing clothes and footwear.

The school provides: transportation and quality rental mountain bikes, daily access fees.

Students provide personal gear mentioned above.

Pre-requisites: Being able to pedal a bicycle and start pedaling from a complete stop with one foot on the ground.

 

Reimbursement policy:

Equipment rental and other financial arrangements must be made in advance to prepare this course, consequently students not able to attend the class outings will not be reimbursed and may receive an automatic failure. All outings are mandatory.

 

Special conditions: The use of alcohol, tobacco, recreational drugs or Energy drinks such the “Monster” or “Red Bull” brands or any other brand of similar drinks is strictly prohibited during all physical education courses, including the outings. The use of “Gatorade” or “Powerade” types of beverages is allowed. Students failing to comply with these conditions will receive a failing grade for the course.

 

Questions and information: YOUR TEACHER Martin Beaumont (mbeaumont@slc.qc.ca)

109-102-U4Stress Management & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Students will evaluate their attitudes and skills, observe rules, apply safety guidelines, set objectives and interpret their progress during the course. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills, fitness levels and attitudes specific to the activity. Flexibility and cardiovascular fitness (V02Max) assessments will be included in this course. A variety of cardiovascular activities, stretching exercises and physical and mental relaxation techniques (breathing techniques, autogenic training, progressive muscular relaxation, meditation, mental imagery, basic massage maneuvers, basic Tai Chi and Yoga exercises) will be planned in an effort to expose students to both stress and time management concepts. Courses will be held in room 135 (fitness center). Course fee: Exempt. Equipment: Students are expected to wear a change of clothes, running shoes and asked to supply their personal towel when using the fitness center. 

109-102-V4Rock Climbing & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Students will evaluate their attitudes and skills, observe rules, apply safety guidelines, set objectives and interpret their progress during the course. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills, fitness levels and attitudes specific to the activity. Delire indoor certification (top roping) and muscular fitness assessments (route grading) will be included in this course. Intensive indoor and outdoor adventure workshops including basic rock climbing activities and learning sessions will take place at Gym Delire and the Pylône. A few theory courses will be held in room 281. Course schedule:* Consult course calendar for outing dates and times. Classes last three hours and missing one weekly class may lead to an automatic failure in this course. Outings: Section 10915 - Saturday, August 27, 2016 Section 10916 - Sunday, August 28, 2016 Course fee: 85$ (subject to change). Must paid when you accept the final version of your schedule and includes transportation for week-day courses , equipment and facility user fees. Equipment: Gym Delire provides rock climbing shoes. The College provides safety helmets and harness for the class. Reimbursement policy: Equipment rental and other financial arrangements must be made in advance to prepare this course, consequently students not able to attend the class outings will not be reimbursed and may receive an automatic failure. 

109-102-W4Athletic Excellence & Effectiveness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

Students are credited for the physical activity completed in the context of their elite athletic program. They must engage in a minimum of 10 hours of weekly physical activity to remain in this course. Theoretical sessions dealing with goal setting, effectiveness and exercise prescription strategies will be examined. Students are required to download their sport specific workout activity using the workout logs provided by the professor. Students are expected to apply personalized goal setting strategies and experience appreciable improvement of the motor skills, fitness and attitudes required by the activity. Cardiovascular fitness assessments (V02Max) will be included in this course. Course fee: Exempt. Pre-requisites: This course is designed for elite athletes competing in college intercollegiate men's AAA hockey women's AA basketball, baseball and golf. Other carded athletes at the national and provincial level may also register in this course. All men registered in this course must reach a level of 10.5 on the Leger Lambert Boucher cardiovascular beep test. Women must reach 8.5 Questions and information: any Phys Ed teacher

Concentration Courses

201-NYA-05Differential Calculus (200.B0)

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is a study of change from a mathematical view. Topics covered will include limits and continuity; the definition of the derivative of a function of one variable and the rules for differentiation, implicit differentiation, higher order derivatives, differentials and linear approximations, and l'Hospital's rule. Applications involve curve sketching, maxima and minima, and interpretations of rates of change.

203-NYA-05Mechanics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This is the first course that students must take in physics and, as such, it is a prerequisite to understanding other branches of physics. Students will learn how to describe the motion of objects and the fundamental laws and principles of physics that govern motions. Course content includes: vectors, translational and rotational kinematics, Newton's Laws, translational and rotational dynamics, energy, momentum and the conservation laws.

603-110-LWLiterary Movements

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-4

In this course, through comparative studies of poetic, dramatic and prose fictional works, students will explore the key movements, texts and conventions of English literature. Students will be able to identify and discuss the literary movements operating inside such works of fiction.

General Education Courses

603-103-MQLiterary Themes in Poetry

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-3

In this course, the student will critically examine literary themes such as: love, nature, war, death, the creative artistic process, the divine. The student will analyze these themes as found in the literary form of poetry, and will therefore also be expected to be familiar with such concepts as rhyme, rhythm and figurative language in its various forms. Besides being able to recognize the literary theme in a poem, the student will see it in its cultural context and as a comment on human values and experience.

Second Required French Course

Weighting: 3-0-3

The level you take will be based on the level of your first French course.

Winter semester

602-BNR-LWFondements de la communication française

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra à l'étudiant d'apprendre à distinguer les caractéristiques formelles des principaux types de textes liés à son champ d'études pour arriver à les commenter. De plus, l'étudiant développera ses compétences afin de rédiger des textes liés à son champ d'études en respectant la structure adéquate de même que le code grammatical. À la fin du cours, l'étudiant devra être en mesure de rédiger un texte de 250 mots lié à son champ d'étude.

602-BNS-LWLangue française et réalité

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours aidera l'étudiant à communiquer en français avec plus d'aisance. À la fin du cours, l'élève devra pouvoir comprendre un texte écrit de 1000 mots et rédiger un texte de 350 mots à l'aide d'une grammaire, d'un dictionnaire et d'un répertoire de verbes.

602-BNT-LWExpression française informative & démonstrative

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours aidera l'étudient à communiquer en français avec aisance dans son champ d'étude particulier autant que possible. Il comprend l'étude des textes d'origines diverses, la rédaction de résumés et la révision de certaines difficultés de la grammaire française.

602-BNU-MQExpression française informative et argumentative

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra à l'étudiant d'écrire une dissertation en français sur un sujet relié à son champ d'études autant que possible. L'étudiant développera de façon plus particulière ses capacités d'analyse et de rédaction, et acquerra les connaissances nécessaires pour produire un bon texte informatif, argumentatif et critique de spectacle ainsi qu'une analyse littéraire. À la fin du cours, l'étudiant devra être en mesure de rédiger des textes de 500 à 750 mots portant sur divers sujets culturels, sociaux ou scientifiques.

602-BNV-LWCommunication écrite

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra aux étudiants de transposer les théories liées à l'analyse littéraire vers les discours sociaux qui les entourent, soit les médias et la publicité. De plus, ils devront améliorer leur maîtrise stylistique et syntaxique afin d'atteindre différents objectifs préétablis.

Humanities - Knowledge

Weighting: 3-1-3

Taking a cue from its title, the Knowledge course is about forms of human knowledge. It is about how to distinguish between belief and knowledge in various domains, and about the method or methods by which human beings gain knowledge. Finally, the Knowledge course looks at how various types of knowledge are organized and used in our everyday and social lives. 

345-101-2QKnowledge (Lecture)

Hours: 60

Weighting: 3-1-3

Lecture Pedagogy: Knowledge Lecture (L) sections are given by means of lecture pedagogy. The teacher lectures about the course content, using different pedagogical devices such as Power Point presentations, board notes, asking students to do smaller group discussions, and study questions. Sometimes students consider a cultural production (film, play) or are asked to attend a guest lecture. Consonant with the goal of the course, students will learn about rational argument as our general means of gaining knowledge and will put this method into practice throughout the course. Students will thus learn to recognize, analyze, evaluate, and use argument in thinking about, reading and writing about human knowledge. Students will also look at how other methods of obtaining knowledge compare to rational argument. Since the course is about human knowledge, individual sections focus on the varieties of human knowledge into which students are being inducted during their CEGEP studies. Knowledge (L) course content includes knowledge issues in mathematics, science, social sciences and commerce, literature and drama, the fine arts and music. Check course outlines for information about specific course content, readings and course material, in any given semester. 

345-101-3QKnowledge (Seminar)

Hours: 60

Weighting: 3-1-3

Seminar Pedagogy: The Knowledge Seminar (S) course distinguishes itself by its seminar pedagogy. Classes consist of round-table discussion seminars in which students are expected to engage with the text under study, and also with other participants in the seminar. The aim is to encourage in students to undertake a critical approach together, to problems of knowledge as they arise in various texts (philosophical, literary, scientific, social scientific, etc.), in order to gain an understanding of, and analyse, problems of knowledge. Knowledge (S) sections take as their subject matter the forms of human knowledge into which students are being inducted during their cégep studies. Discussion topics, as they arise in our texts, might include knowledge issues in mathematics, science, social sciences and commerce, literature and drama, the fine arts and music. Students should look at the course outlines Knowledge (S) courses in any one session for more precise information about course content, readings and material to be studied. In addition, since method itself is a problem of knowledge, the seminar process of argument and discussion engaged in and applied during classes provides yet another subject for participants to reflect upon and discuss.

Concentration Courses

201-NYB-05Integral Calculus (200.B0)

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course centres upon antiderivatives and their uses, integrals of functions of one variable, the fundamental theorem of calculus and methods of integration. Applications involve areas, volumes of revolution, length of a curve, etc. Improper integrals and sequences, series and power series are also considered.

203-NYB-05Electricity and Magnetism

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This is the second course that students must take in physics, and it will provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the laws of electromagnetism. Course content includes: electric charge and Coulomb's Law, electric field and Gauss' Law, electric potential, capacitance, electric current, circuits, moving charges and magnetism, the magnetic field, Ampere's Law, Faraday's Law, inductance and Maxwell's Equations.

607-210-LWSpanish II

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course consists of an acquisition of basic language structures and vocabulary. There will be intensive oral practice and more complex reading and writing exercises. Students will discover other aspects of the culture of Spanish-speaking countries

General Education Courses

603-102-MQLiterary Genres

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-3

This course will allow the student to make an intensive analysis of the literary genre of the drama. The principal general purpose of this analysis is to see how drama functions as a unique means of commenting upon the human situation. Furthermore the student will learn to understand a work's relationship to its literary, cultural and historical contexts and sill explicate a work (or works) representative of the genre.

Physical Activity and Health

Weighting: 1-1-1

Physical Activity and Health deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle. 

109-101-A4Adapted Physical Education & Health

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

This version of the Physical Activity and Health course deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle for students with specific physical needs. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle. 

109-101-C4Health & General Fitness

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Physical Activity and Health deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle.

109-101-F4Health & Spinning

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Physical Activity and Health deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle.

109-101-G4Health & Cross Training

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

This course is designed to enable students to experiment part of the Hatha yoga tradition, and is a Vinyasa style. Students will be involved in linking several poses together to create strength, flexibility, endurance, and balance. At the end of each class, students will benefit from a cool-down including a final relaxation and deep breathing. Complimentary to the yoga activities, students will apply a strategic health promoting strategy by managing the elements that support the pursuit of a physically active lifestyle. Students will be introduced to a Physically Active Lifestyle Management (PALM) model that outlines a process designed to promote health-enhancing outcomes. While class time is used to guide the student in this process, a portion of the active lifestyle management plan will be completed by the student outside of class time (10 hours per semester). Exercise context, motivation, behavior modification strategies, will be examined.

Courses will be held in the yoga room (room 118) and, occasionally in the fitness center (room 135). Classes last one period. There are two periods a week.

 

Equipment: Students should have proper clothing and can bring their own yoga mat to class.

 

109-101-I4Health & Athletic Excellence

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Physical Activity and Health deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle.

109-101-J4Health & Volleyball

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Physical Activity and Health deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle.

109-101-K4Health & Weight Training

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Physical Activity and Health deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle.

109-101-L4Health & Aerobic Dance

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Physical Activity and Health deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle.

109-101-Q4Health &Team Sports

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Physical Activity and Health deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle.

109-101-U4Health & Stress Management

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Physical Activity and Health deals with the relationship between good health and lifestyle. The students are called upon to experiment with one or more physical activities, and to relate them to their abilities, their needs, their motivation, their lifestyle, and their knowledge of health promotion. This enables them to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities which constitutes part of a healthy lifestyle. Other lifestyle behaviors, such as nutrition, stress management, drinking and driving, and sexual behavior will also be investigated as they relate to a healthy lifestyle.

109-101-V4Health and Yoga

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Health and Yoga deals with the relationship between physical activity, health and lifestyle factors. Accessibility factors, financial resources, skill level, motivation, fitness level, social context will be examined in an effort to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities that can lead to a healthy lifestyle. Physical fitness and three other lifestyle behaviors will be investigated. Complimentary to these health influencing factors, students will experiment part of the hatha yoga tradition, and is a Vinyasa style. Students will be involved in linking several poses together to create strength, flexibility, endurance, and balance. At the end of each class, students will benefit from a cool-down including a final relaxation and deep breathing. Students will also be subjected to a battery of fitness tests leading them to interpret their results and understand specific exercise prescription factors designed to achieve health fitness standards and more.

Courses will be held in room 118 (yoga room).

 

109-101-O4Health, Snowshoeing and Cross-Country Skiing

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Health and Snowshoeing and Cross-Country Skiing deals with the relationship between physical activity, health and lifestyle factors. Accessibility factors, financial resources, skill level, motivation, fitness level, social context will be examined in an effort to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities that can lead to a healthy lifestyle. Physical fitness and three other lifestyle behaviors will be investigated.  Complimentary to these health influencing factors, one intensive outdoor day (Saturday or Sunday) will take place at Station Touristique Duchesnay. Students will experiment cross-country skiing and snowshoeing. Return transportation from the College to the outdoor outing locations will be provided by the college. One local hike and one sledding outing will also be done during class time. Students will also be subjected to a battery of fitness tests leading them to interpret their results and understand specific exercise prescription factors designed to achieve health fitness standards and more.

Courses will be held in room 135 (fitness center).

 

Course fee: A class fee must be paid when you accept the final version of your schedule and includes transportation and user fees.

Equipment: Students should have proper winter clothing and shoes adapted to the activity.

Reimbursement policy: Financial arrangements must be made in advance to prepare this course, consequently students not able to attend the class outings will not be reimbursed and may receive an automatic failure.

Special conditions: The use of alcohol, tobacco or recreational drugs is strictly prohibited during all physical education courses. Students failing to comply with these conditions will receive a failing grade for the course.

 

109-101-U4Health and Stress Management

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Health and Stress Management deals with the relationship between physical activity, health and lifestyle factors. Accessibility factors, financial resources, skill level, motivation, fitness level, social context will be examined in an effort to make an appropriate and justified choice of physical activities that can lead to a healthy lifestyle. Physical fitness and three other lifestyle behaviors will be investigated. Complimentary to these health influencing factors, a variety of cardiovascular activities, stretching exercises and physical and mental relaxation techniques (breathing techniques, autogenic training, progressive muscular relaxation, meditation, mental imagery, basic massage maneuvers, basic Tai Chi and Yoga exercises) will be planned to expose students to various forms of stress management. Students will also be subjected to a battery of fitness tests leading them to interpret their results and understand specific exercise prescription factors designed to achieve health fitness standards and more.

Courses will be held in the gymnasium.

 

Concentration Courses

201-NYC-05Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry (200.B0)

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is an introduction to linear algebra. Topics include vectors as directed line segments and in component form, linear dependence, basis, vector spaces and subspaces, dot and cross products, n-tuples as vectors, and vector equations of lines in two-space and of lines and planes in three-space, in addition to matrices: matrix arithmetic and inverses, determinants, and linear systems of equations and matrices.

202-NYA-05General Chemistry

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course forms the basis for all studies in chemistry. It includes the following topics: atomic and electronic structure, the periodic table, chemical nomenclature and equations, stoichiometry, ionic and covalent bonding, molecular geometry, intermolecular forces, kinetic-molecular theory, gas laws, the solid and liquid states and phase changes, and an introduction to some descriptive chemistry.

607-310-LWSpanish III

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course consists of a review of basic grammar and the acquisition of more complex grammar structures. There will be intensive oral and written practice, a systematic increase of vocabulary, and extensive reading. Students will become more familiar with the culture of Spanish-speaking countries. They will acquire basic concepts of linguistics, as applied to the learning of Spanish.

609-110-LWGerman I (Based on Placement)

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Students will acquire basic written and oral structures and vocabulary related to everyday situations. There will be oral practice, as well as reading and writing activities. Students will be introduced to the culture of German-speaking countries.

General Education Courses

603-BNR-LWLong Fiction

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-2

In this course, students will study the novel as a means of commenting on the human condition. Furthermore, student will learn how a work is related to its literary, cultural and historical contexts and will explicate works representative of the genre. Thematic approaches appropriate for Science students, ALC students, Business students and Social Science students will be examined. Fiction as a mirror of the world in general and in terms of the students’ pre-university programs of studies will be included.

Concentration Courses

101-NYA-05General Biology I

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

The purpose of this course is to provide an overall survey of living organisms from both an evolutionary and an ecological perspective. We begin by addressing the genetic code, cell reproduction, and the mechanisms governing heredity. From here, we examine the evolutionary processes by which today's life forms have originated through the descent and modification of more ancient forms of life, as well as the underlying genetic mechanisms responsible for this change. We then look at the possible origins of life on earth, and the evolutionary processes that could have led from the first unicellular organisms to the multicellular complexity of our current ecosystems. Finally, we examine some of the ecological principles governing the relationships between organisms and their environments, and address some of the Earth's major environmental problems.

202-NYB-05Chemistry of Solutions

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is a continuation of General Chemistry and focuses on the properties of the dissolved state, including the characterisation of solutions, colloids, colligative properties, reaction kinetics and mechanisms, homogeneous equilibria, solubility equilibria, acids and bases, buffer systems, and oxidation-reduction reactions and electrochemistry.

603-210-LWCanadian Arts and Literature

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course is an exploration of Canadian cultural expression through the study of Canadian literature and associated arts. Students will explore and examine the relationship between works of Canadian fiction, cultural institutions and the creative process.

602-210-LWQu'est-ce qu'un classique québecois?

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-3

Dans ce cours, les étudiants devront reconnaître des classiques québécois, leurs qualités esthétiques, leur contexte de réalisation et de légitimation. Ce cours leur permettra de comprendre la nature des liens qui unissent la littérature et l’identité québécoise. Les étudiants devront utiliser de manière appropriée la terminologie en arts, lettres et communication et démontrer leur capacité d’effectuer une recherche comportant un volet analytique, selon la méthodologie propre à leur domaine d’étude.

607-410-LWSpanish IV

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

In this course the students will learn more complex grammar structures and acquire additional vocabulary needed to understand and to interact spontaneously in an additional number of everyday situations. They will demonstrate familiarity with other aspects of the culture of Spanish-speaking countries.

609-210-LWGerman II

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Students will acquire basic written and oral structures and vocabulary related to everyday situations. There will be oral practice and more complex reading and writing exercises. Students will discover the culture of German-speaking countries.

General Education Courses

Humanities - World Views

Weighting: 3-0-3

Whether we are aware of it or not, all of us have internalised, and are guided in our interactions with others by, a perspective on reality – or, a world view.  Our world view is influenced by many things – the family and culture in which we are raised, religious beliefs we might be attached to, the literary and cultural productions of our time and place, the general social, political and economic structures of our society, the power of science and the knowledge it has given us, the historical epoch in which we live, the arts and media. The World Views course seeks to enable students to take a critical-humanistic stance to their view(s) of the world; and to show students that the world is viewed in a multitude of ways, which themselves have multiple sources and influences. In being able to gain critical distance, students should come understand what is thought to be important by holders of a world view and why. Students will gain an understanding of the difficulty of claims to truth related to any one world view; and in so doing, will learn to critically examine how a world view is related to its justification. Ultimately, the World Views course seeks to enable students to critically compare world views from a humanistic perspective, to see which views are justified and on what basis. The point is to broaden students’ perspectives on our shared human reality to help them make intelligent and caring choices in their own personal and social lives.

345-102-2QWorld Views Lecture

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The World Views Lecture (L) course distinguishes itself by means of lecture pedagogy. The teacher lectures about the course content, using different pedagogical devices such as Power Point presentations, board notes, asking students to do smaller group discussions, and study questions. Sometimes students consider a cultural production (film, play) or are asked to attend a guest lecture. Consonant with the goal of the course, lectures are focussed upon the examination of several world views, such as: philosophical, familial-cultural and/or literary-cultural, religious, socio-political and/or economic, scientific or historical. Precise course content and texts chosen vary with the section of the course. Students should check the course outlines in any one semester for more precise information on the content, readings, and course material in different sections.

345-102-3QWorld Views Seminar

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The World Views Seminar (S) course distinguishes itself by its seminar pedagogy. Classes consist of round-table discussion seminars in which students will actively engage with the text under study, and also to engage, by means of reasoned discussion, with other participants in the seminar, including the teacher. By means of such reasoned discussion, students will learn to describe and compare selected world views, to explain some of the major ideas, values and implications of these world views, and to organize them into coherent patterns. The aim of seminar pedagogy in the World Views course is to encourage students to undertake a critical-humanistic approach together to differing perspectives on reality. Students should check the course outlines in any one semester for more precise information on the course content, readings and study materials.

345-102-4QWorld Views: History of Art

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

History of Art: The department also offers more specialized World View Lecture courses in the content areas of Art History. In World Views – History of Art, the teacher lectures about the course content, using mainly PowerPoint presentations, but may ask students to engage in smaller group discussions, work on study questions, or apply theoretical knowledge to visual exercises, namely recognizing artists and their underlying world view by relying on Prezi presentations. Other times students could be asked to attend a guest lecture, or visit a museum. Consonant with the goal of the course, lectures are focussed upon the examination of differing world views as incarnated in art. Different aspects of each world view – whether they be philosophical, familial-cultural and/or literary-cultural, religious, socio-political and/or economic, scientific or historical – will be focused on the artistic movement under study or on the centre of interest of the artist. Precise course content and texts chosen vary with the section of the course. Students should check the course outlines in any one semester for more precise information on the content, readings, and course material in different sections.

Physical Activity and Autonomy

Weighting: 1-1-1

109-103-C4General Fitness & Autonomy

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Students will apply a strategic health promoting strategy by managing the elements that support the pursuit of a physically active lifestyle. Students will be introduced to a Physically Active Lifestyle Management (PALM) model that outlines a process designed to promote health-enhancing outcomes. While class time is used to guide the student in this process, a portion of the active lifestyle management plan will completed by the student outside of class time (10 hours per semester). A variety of cardiovascular activities, muscular, core and stretching exercises will be planned in an effort to expose students to fitness trends and exercise prescription guidelines. Exercise context, motivation, behavior modification strategies, active nutrition, time management and stress management will be examined. Courses will be held in room 135 (fitness center). Course fee: Fitness centre registration fee is included with the physical education manual purchase. Equipment: Students are expected to wear workout clothing, running shoes and asked to supply their personal towel and water bottle when working out the fitness center.

109-103-F4Rafting & Autonomy

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Intensive outdoor adventure workshops and activity learning sessions will take place on the Jacques Cartier River. Rafting maneuvers, safety, river swimming, white water reading and navigation, team communication will be addressed. Complementary to rafting activities, students will apply a strategic health promoting strategy by managing the elements that support the pursuit of a physically active lifestyle. Students will be introduced to a Physically Active Lifestyle Management (PALM) model that outlines a process designed to promote health-enhancing outcomes. While class time is used to guide the student in this process, a portion of the active lifestyle management plan will completed by the student outside of class time (10 hours per semester). Exercise context, motivation, behavior modification strategies, active nutrition, time management and stress management will be examined. A few courses will held in room 135 (fitness center) and occasionally in room 281 according to the course calendar. Course fee: $160 must paid when you accept the final version of your schedule and includes transportation and rafting fees. Course outing dates: September (depending on the section chosen). Equipment required: Rafts, paddles, life jackets, wet suits and helmet are included in the course fee. Students provide appropriate outdoor clothing. Meals: Students must provide 1 lunch and snacks for each day on the river. A group meal will be included in the course fee after the Saturday river session. Pre-requisites: Being a proficient swimmer, 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ. Reimbursement policy: Equipment rental and other financial arrangements must be made in advance to prepare this course; consequently, students not able to attend the class outings will not be reimbursed and may receive an automatic failure. Special conditions: The use of alcohol, tobacco or recreational drugs is strictly prohibited during all physical education courses. Students failing to comply with these conditions will receive a failing grade for the course.

109-103-E4Winter Camping & Autonomy

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Intensive winter outdoor adventure workshops and activity learning sessions will take place at the Réserve Portneuf. During a weekend outing in the winter-backcountry, students will learn to build snow shelters (quinchee) and experiment with winter survival skills. They will need to come prepared with adequate winter clothing, proper food according to the proposed outdoor nutritional plan, presented in class, have proper gear to work on their quinchees and come with an attitude demonstrating willingness to work in a group setting. Complementary to winter camping activities, students will apply a strategic health promoting strategy by managing the elements that support the pursuit of a physically active lifestyle. Students will be introduced to a Physically Active Lifestyle Management (PALM) model that outlines a process designed to promote health-enhancing outcomes. While class time is used to guide the student in this process, a portion of the active lifestyle management plan will completed by the student outside of class time (10 hours per semester). Exercise context, motivation, behavior modification strategies, active nutrition, time management and stress management will be examined. Students will also be provided with lodging for the first overnight at Chalet Groupe Nature in La Reserve Portneuf. A few courses will held in room 135 (fitness center) and occasionally in room 281 according to the course calendar. Course outing dates: February. Course fee: $165 must be paid prior to setting out for the class outing in the first week of school and includes transportation and equipment rental fees. Equipment required: Winter sleeping bags, overnight accessories as well as cooking gear and stoves are provided by the college. Students will be required to wear appropriate winter clothing as recommended during outing preparation courses. Meals: During the outing, students must provide food for personal meals (3 lunches, 1 supper, 2 breakfasts, 6-7 snacks and 2 liters of water). A group supper on Friday evening (Teacher's Cookout) is included in the course fee. Pre-requisites: 109-101 MQ and 109-102 MQ. Reimbursement policy: Equipment rental and other financial arrangements must be made in advance to prepare this course, consequently students not able to attend the class outings will not be reimbursed and may receive an automatic failure. Special conditions: The use of alcohol, tobacco or recreational drugs is strictly prohibited during all physical education courses. Students failing to comply with these conditions will receive a failing grade for the course. 

109-103-I4Athletic Excellence & Autonomy

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

This course is designed particularly for athletes participating in AAA intercollegiate athletics or other high performance sports characterized by annual training leading to provincial, national or international level competitions. Selected classes will be identified in the course outline to examine the principles associated with the management of lifestyle factors that contribute to maintaining a healthy and active way of living. These factors will be integrated by the students as they pursue activities associated with their specific high performance athletic program. Student-athletes will be required to maintain personal training logs that are used to describe their training context and objectives throughout the semester. Pre-requisite: All students must demonstrate a high level of cardiovascular fitness by achieving level 8.5 for women and 10 for men on the Leger Lambert 20 meter shuttle run test. Students will be tested during their first course and those unable to reach this standard will be asked to make a course change and follow the regular physical education curriculum offered by the college. In some cases, students will be required to purchase watches to monitor their personal training activities. These watches are available at the college bookstore.

109-103-M4Canoe Camping & Autonomy

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Intensive outdoor adventure workshops and activity learning sessions will take place on the Rivière Batiscan and the Réserve Portneuf. Basic equipment, white river paddling skills, tandem canoe maneuvers, river swimming and safety, reading white water and planning fast water route swill be examined. Complimentary to canoe camping activities, students will apply a strategic health promoting strategy by managing the elements that support the pursuit of a physically active lifestyle. Students will be introduced to a Physically Active Lifestyle Management (PALM) model that outlines a process designed to promote health-enhancing outcomes While class time is used to guide the student in this process, a portion of the active lifestyle management plan will completed by the student outside of class time (10 hours per semester). Exercise context, motivation, behavior modification strategies, active nutrition, time management and stress management will be examined. A few courses will held in room 135 (fitness center) and occasionally in room 281 according to the course calendar. All students must attend the mandatory preparation class in order to qualify for the weekend expedition. Students not able to attend this course will be replaced by students on the class waiting list. Course will be held in room 281. Course outing dates: Section 10923 - August 15 to 17, 2016; Section 10924 - August 17 to 19, 2016. Course fee: $160 (subject to change) must paid when you accept the final version of your schedule and includes transportation and equipment rental fees. Equipment required: Canoes, tents, cooking equipment, life jackets are included in the course fee. Students provide personal sleeping bag, appropriate outdoor clothing. Meals: Students must provide food for person meals (3 lunches, 1 supper, 2 breakfasts, 6-7 snacks and 2 liters of water). A group supper on Friday evening (Teacher's Cookout) is included in the course fee. Pre-requisites: Being a proficient swimmer, 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ. Reimbursement policy: Equipment rental and other financial arrangements must be made in advance to prepare this course; consequently, students not able to attend the class outings will not be reimbursed and may receive an automatic failure. Special conditions: The use of alcohol, tobacco or recreational drugs is strictly prohibited during all physical education courses. Students failing to comply with these conditions will receive a failing grade for the course.

109-103-O4Hiking, Snow-Shoeing, X-Country Skiing & Autonomy

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

One intensive outdoor hiking activity will take place at Jacques-Cartier National Park. If cancelled due to strong winds or thunder storm, the outing will be moved to another day. Three local ‘ Urban’ hikes in city parks and active learning sessions including a personal fitness program will be done during class time. Complimentary to the hiking activities, students will apply a strategic health promoting strategy by managing the elements that support the pursuit of a physically active lifestyle. Students will be introduced to a Physically Active Lifestyle Management (PALM) model that outlines a process designed to promote health-enhancing outcomes. While class time is used to guide the student in this process, a portion of the active lifestyle management plan will completed by the student outside of class time (10 hours per semester). Exercise context, motivation, behavior modification strategies, will be examined. Courses will occasionally be held in the gymnasium (room 281) and room 135 (fitness center). Classes last two hours.

 

Course fee:$50 must paid when you accept the final version of your schedule and includes trail fees and transportation for all outings

Equipment: Students should have a light back pack, proper clothing and shoes adapted to the activity.

Reimbursement policy: Financial arrangements must be made in advance to prepare this course, consequently students not able to attend the class outings will not be reimbursed and may receive an automatic failure.

Special conditions: The use of alcohol, tobacco or recreational drugs is strictly prohibited during all physical education courses. Students failing to comply with these conditions will receive a failing grade for the course.

 

109-103-P4Mountain Biking & Autonomy

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Intensive outdoor adventure workshops and activity learning sessions will take place at the college and at Vallée Bras du Nord biking trails. Trekking techniques, bike repair, trail course planning , cycling techniques, gear changing, braking, jumping and crash avoidance techniques will be examined. Complementary to the mountain biking, students will apply a strategic health promoting strategy by managing the elements that support the pursuit of a physically active lifestyle. Students will be introduced to a Physically Active Lifestyle Management (PALM) model that outlines a process designed to promote health-enhancing outcomes. While class time is used to guide the student in this process, a portion of the active lifestyle management plan will completed by the student outside of class time (10 hours per semester). Exercise context, motivation, behavior modification strategies, active nutrition, time management and stress management will be examined. A few courses will be held in room 135 (fitness center) and occasionally in room 281 according to the course calendar. Course outing dates: Sept. 12-13, 2016 at Bras du Nord. Course fee: $110 (subject to change) must paid when you accept the final version of your schedule includes transportation and trail fees. Equipment: Students must provide a functional mountain bike in good working condition, helmet, water bottle and personal bike repair kit for the outing. Meals: Students must provide 1 lunch and snacks for each day on the bike. No overnight camping is planned for this course. Reimbursement policy: Equipment rental and other financial arrangements must be made in advance to prepare this course; consequently, students not able to attend the class outings will not be reimbursed and may receive an automatic failure. Pre-requisites: 109-101-MQ and 109-102-MQ. Special conditions: The use of alcohol, tobacco or recreational drugs is strictly prohibited during all physical education courses. Students failing to comply with these conditions will receive a failing grade for the course. 

109-103-Z4Business Fitness & Autonomy

Hours: 30

Weighting: 1-1-1

Students will apply a strategic health promoting strategy by managing the elements that support the pursuit of a physically active lifestyle. Students will be introduced to a Physically Active Lifestyle Management (PALM) model that outlines a process designed to promote health-enhancing outcomes. Business for Fitness students will carry out daily physical activity session and monitor their personal workouts using bio-feedback watch technology (smart phone apps may also be used). Students will complete their course in a fifteen-week period and must carry out a minimum of 3 hours of monitored physical activity per week. Students are required to download their workout activity at the end of each week at the computer station designated by the course professor. Course fee: Students may purchase or rent a heart rate watch at the campus bookstore to monitor their personal activity workouts during the semester. Alternative devices may be used but must be capable of electronically capturing and downloading exercise variables, including heart rate values and exercise time.

109-103-G4Yoga and Autonomy

Hours: 30

Weighting: 0-2-1

This course is designed to enable students to experiment part of the Hatha yoga tradition, and is a vVnyasa style. Students will be involved in linking several poses together to create strength, flexibility, endurance, and balance. At the end of each class, students will benefit from a cool-down including a final relaxation and deep breathing. Complimentary to the yoga activities, students will apply a strategic health promoting strategy by managing the elements that support the pursuit of a physically active lifestyle. Students will be introduced to a Physically Active Lifestyle Management (PALM) model that outlines a process designed to promote health-enhancing outcomes. While class time is used to guide the student in this process, a portion of the active lifestyle management plan will be completed by the student outside of class time (10 hours per semester). Exercise context, motivation, behavior modification strategies, will be examined.

Courses will be held in the yoga room (room 118) and, occasionally in the fitness center (room 135). Classes last one period. There are two periods a week.

 

Equipment: Students should have proper clothing and can bring their own yoga mat to class.

 

Concentration Courses

203-NYC-05Waves, Optics and Modern Physics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This is the third course that students must take in physics, and it will provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the principles of wave motion as they pertain to light and sound. Course content includes: oscillations, simple harmonic motion, mechanical waves, sound, the Doppler effect, light, optics, electromagnetic theory, the concept of a photon and other selected topics of modern physics.

Science/Math Option (Choose 1)

Weighting: 3-2-3

101-BNB-05General Biology II

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

The objective of this course is to look at homeostasis as a unifying principle in the life processes of plants and animals. Topics include cell structure and function, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, membrane transport, gas exchange, and reproduction. It will be shown that each of these processes includes pathways common to all living organisms, thus providing additional support for evolutionary theory.

201-BNJ-05Topics in Mathematics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course deals with topics fundamental for anyone planning studies in mathematics, science, engineering or computer science at the university level. The course covers sequences, series, sigma notation and proof by induction; complex numbers: Cartesian, polar and trigonometric form, operations, and de Moivre's theorem; polynomials: polynomial functions and equations over the rational, real and complex numbers; planar transformations; techniques of counting, the binomial theorem, and an introduction to probability.

201-BNK-05Advanced Calculus

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is an in-depth look at single variable calculus and extensions to functions of two or more variables. The course will cover formal definitions of limit and continuity; functions of two or more variables, partial derivatives, tangent planes, directional derivatives, rates of change, and extrema on surfaces; multiple integrals, areas and volumes, etc.; and separable and linear differential equations. Other topics in advanced calculus may also be studied.

201-BNL-05Probability and Statistics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is an introduction to statistics for those with a background in calculus. This course is a study of descriptive statistics; combinatorial analysis and the binomial theorem; rules of probability, conditional probability and Bayes' theorem; discrete and continuous random variables; probability distributions; the central limit theorem; and inferential statistics: estimation and testing of hypotheses.

202-BNC-05Organic Chemistry I

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Organic Chemistry is the study of the physical and chemical properties of the compounds of carbon that, as a class, constitute the vast majority of chemical compounds. Organic Chemistry I applies and extends general chemical principles seen in general chemistry courses. The organizing axiom of this course is that structure determines function, which is expressed in physical properties and chemical reactivity. After a review of basic concepts of bonding, structure and acid/base theory, a survey of the major organic functional groups will be done, followed by an introduction to organic chemical reactivity. Then the class will explore in depth the structure, nomenclature, physical properties, reactions and syntheses of several families of organic compounds, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics and alkyl halides. The concepts of stereoisomerism and optical activity are also introduced. Emphasis will be placed on reaction mechanisms and the physio-chemical principles that underlie functional group behaviour. The laboratory portion of the course includes an introduction to infrared spectrophotometry.

203-BNM-05Astrophysics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course will provide a fundamental knowledge of the various components of the universe and their properties using the principles of physics. Course content includes: the night sky, the solar system, stars, the Milky Way, galaxies and cosmology. The motions, properties and evolution of celestial objects will be discussed using the laws of physics. The course is integrative, developing in particular the relationship between astrophysics and the other, compulsory, physics courses. Links with chemistry and biology are made when studying planetary, solar-system and interstellar environments. Detailed work will be carried out in research projects that will cover such topics as: the study of a telescope, planetary and satellite orbits, solar rotation, the measurement of relief features on the moon and the computation of tides. If time allows, the course will include an introduction to the Special Theory of Relativity.

203-BNP-LWIntroduction to Thermodynamics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is intended as an introduction to the principles of thermodynamics for students who intend to pursue their studies in either the biological or physical sciences. It will provide students with the knowledge of the fundamental laws of thermodynamics and their applications to a variety of temperature-dependent systems, as well as an introduction to kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Course content includes: heat, temperature and thermal equilibrium, the kinetic theory of gases, probability distributions, work and the first law of thermodynamics, reversible, irreversible and cyclic processes, engines, refrigerators, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, state functions, enthalpy, and Gibbs free energy.

203-BNN-LWContemporary Physics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course offers an overview of the development of physics in the 20th century. In this course, we look at the experiments that lead to the birth of quantum theory and learn its basic principles. We will study the classical and quantum models of the atom and apply the quantum model to various applications. This course also includes a study of nuclear structure and the models used to explain radioactivity, fusion and fission. Students will classify the fundamental particles according to their properties, interactions, conservation laws and decay properties. They will explore the world of accelerators and detectors and acquire the basic notions of cosmology and space-time physics.

603-310-LWPerspectives in English Literature

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-3

Students will learn to identify and apply different critical perspectives to works of literature and discover how such theories lead to contrasting views of the human condition.

602-920-LWFondements de la langue française

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Dans ce cours, les étudiants apprendront à mieux connaître la linguistique, les sous-disciplines qui la composent ainsi que son champ d’application. Ils démontreront leur capacité d’effectuer une analyse au moyen des méthodes propres à la linguistique appliquée en langue française.

609-310-LWGerman III

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Students will acquire more complex written and oral structure with a systematic increase of vocabulary related to everyday situations. Students will become more familiar with culture of German speaking countries. They will acquire basic concepts of linguistics, as applied to the learning of German.

General Education Courses

Humanities - Ethics (Pre-University)

Weighting: 3-0-3

In general, ethics deals with theories of value and issues and policy questions concerning values. Ethics as a subject considers important and wide-reaching questions concerning human thought, human action and interaction, human conduct with other humans, other beings and the world. Some questions concerned are: “What is the nature of ethical value?”; “What are our values based on?”; “Are there any universal, a-historical values?”; “What are different viewpoints concerning ethical issues and value problems?”; and “How can human beings consider these questions and issues rationally”? Because ethics is primarily about values (as opposed to facts), it is studied in the humanities; historically-speaking, it is a major branch of philosophy. In this particular ethics course, students learn “to apply a critical thought process to ethical issues relevant to their field of study.” The ethics course is designed to introduce students to ethical issues and engage them in a reflection on them. The course situates ethical issues in their world views and deals with the kinds of knowledge they involve. Major ideas, values and social implications of various ethical issues are explained and organized into coherent patterns.

 

345-BNR-23

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The Ethics Lecture (L) sections are distinguished by means of lecture pedagogy. The teacher lectures about the course content, using different pedagogical devices such as PowerPoint presentations, board notes, smaller group discussions, and study questions. Sometimes students consider a cultural production (film, play) or are asked to attend a guest lecture. In keeping with ministerial guidelines, the department offers one more content-specific course. Ethics (L) Business Administration Technology is designed to engage students in reflection on issues related to the present business world.

345-BNR-33

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The Ethics Seminar (S) sections are distinguished by means of seminar pedagogy. Classes are round-table discussion seminars in which students are expected to engage in reasoned discussion with other students and with their teacher. These discussions are focussed upon specific readings which raise different ethical theories, issues, questions and judgments. The method of reasoned discussion in seminar is meant to complement the textual reflections themselves, and to aid students in developing a critical-humanistic approach to the bases for their own ethical view points and judgments.

Concentration Courses

Science/Math Option (Choose 1)

Weighting: 3-2-3

101-BNB-05General Biology II

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

The objective of this course is to look at homeostasis as a unifying principle in the life processes of plants and animals. Topics include cell structure and function, photosynthesis, cellular respiration, membrane transport, gas exchange, and reproduction. It will be shown that each of these processes includes pathways common to all living organisms, thus providing additional support for evolutionary theory.

201-BNJ-05Topics in Mathematics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course deals with topics fundamental for anyone planning studies in mathematics, science, engineering or computer science at the university level. The course covers sequences, series, sigma notation and proof by induction; complex numbers: Cartesian, polar and trigonometric form, operations, and de Moivre's theorem; polynomials: polynomial functions and equations over the rational, real and complex numbers; planar transformations; techniques of counting, the binomial theorem, and an introduction to probability.

201-BNK-05Advanced Calculus

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is an in-depth look at single variable calculus and extensions to functions of two or more variables. The course will cover formal definitions of limit and continuity; functions of two or more variables, partial derivatives, tangent planes, directional derivatives, rates of change, and extrema on surfaces; multiple integrals, areas and volumes, etc.; and separable and linear differential equations. Other topics in advanced calculus may also be studied.

201-BNL-05Probability and Statistics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is an introduction to statistics for those with a background in calculus. This course is a study of descriptive statistics; combinatorial analysis and the binomial theorem; rules of probability, conditional probability and Bayes' theorem; discrete and continuous random variables; probability distributions; the central limit theorem; and inferential statistics: estimation and testing of hypotheses.

202-BNC-05Organic Chemistry I

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Organic Chemistry is the study of the physical and chemical properties of the compounds of carbon that, as a class, constitute the vast majority of chemical compounds. Organic Chemistry I applies and extends general chemical principles seen in general chemistry courses. The organizing axiom of this course is that structure determines function, which is expressed in physical properties and chemical reactivity. After a review of basic concepts of bonding, structure and acid/base theory, a survey of the major organic functional groups will be done, followed by an introduction to organic chemical reactivity. Then the class will explore in depth the structure, nomenclature, physical properties, reactions and syntheses of several families of organic compounds, including alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, aromatics and alkyl halides. The concepts of stereoisomerism and optical activity are also introduced. Emphasis will be placed on reaction mechanisms and the physio-chemical principles that underlie functional group behaviour. The laboratory portion of the course includes an introduction to infrared spectrophotometry.

203-BNM-05Astrophysics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course will provide a fundamental knowledge of the various components of the universe and their properties using the principles of physics. Course content includes: the night sky, the solar system, stars, the Milky Way, galaxies and cosmology. The motions, properties and evolution of celestial objects will be discussed using the laws of physics. The course is integrative, developing in particular the relationship between astrophysics and the other, compulsory, physics courses. Links with chemistry and biology are made when studying planetary, solar-system and interstellar environments. Detailed work will be carried out in research projects that will cover such topics as: the study of a telescope, planetary and satellite orbits, solar rotation, the measurement of relief features on the moon and the computation of tides. If time allows, the course will include an introduction to the Special Theory of Relativity.

203-BNP-LWIntroduction to Thermodynamics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is intended as an introduction to the principles of thermodynamics for students who intend to pursue their studies in either the biological or physical sciences. It will provide students with the knowledge of the fundamental laws of thermodynamics and their applications to a variety of temperature-dependent systems, as well as an introduction to kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. Course content includes: heat, temperature and thermal equilibrium, the kinetic theory of gases, probability distributions, work and the first law of thermodynamics, reversible, irreversible and cyclic processes, engines, refrigerators, entropy and the second law of thermodynamics, state functions, enthalpy, and Gibbs free energy.

203-BNN-LWContemporary Physics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course offers an overview of the development of physics in the 20th century. In this course, we look at the experiments that lead to the birth of quantum theory and learn its basic principles. We will study the classical and quantum models of the atom and apply the quantum model to various applications. This course also includes a study of nuclear structure and the models used to explain radioactivity, fusion and fission. Students will classify the fundamental particles according to their properties, interactions, conservation laws and decay properties. They will explore the world of accelerators and detectors and acquire the basic notions of cosmology and space-time physics.

Science CA/IA Option (Choose 1)

Weighting: 3-2-3

All college programs in Québec have a comprehensive assessment (CA) which evaluates whether students have met the expectations of the graduate profile. In some programs, such as the Science Program, the comprehensive assessment is linked to a course with an integrative activity (IA), building on what was learned in past courses. In the St. Lawrence Science Program, this is done in the CA/IA option course taken in the last semester.

The comprehensive assessment is based on a CA portfolio students produce during the CA/IA course. The portfolio must demonstrate that students have attained the 12 program goals of the graduate profile. It may contain work (tests, assignments, papers and such) completed during any of the coursestaken to fulfill the requirements of the Science Program and documents produced for the exercise on ethical issues, as well as the written report for the integrative activity. Alternatively, the portfolio may be made up of a self-reflective essay that evaluates how students have attained the goals and objectives of the Science Program, citing specific examples of what was done to achieve these goals.

203-BNL-LWCA/IA Contemporary Physics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course offers an overview of the development of physics in the 20th century. In this course, we look at the experiments and models that lead to the birth of nuclear and quantum physics. We will study the classical and quantum models of the atom and discuss the probabilistic nature of the quantum world. This course also includes a study of nuclear structure, radioactivity, fusion and fission. Students will classify the fundamental particles according to their properties, interactions, conservation laws and decay properties. They will explore the world of accelerators and detectors and study the history of the universe. The course is integrative, developing in particular the relationship between contemporary physics and the other, compulsory, physics courses. Detailed work will be carried out in research projects (IA) that will cover such topics as: lasers, black holes, nanotechnologies, fission, superconductivity and string theory. Students who complete CA/IA-contemporary physics are not eligible to take the course Contemporary Physics (203-BNL-05)

203-BNM-LWCA/IA - Astrophysics

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course will give students a fundamental knowledge of the various components of the universe and their properties using the principles of physics. The course is integrative, developing in particular the relationship between astrophysics and the other, compulsory, physics courses. Links with chemistry and biology are made when studying planetary, solar system and interstellar environments. Course content includes: the night sky, the solar system, stars, the Milky Way, galaxies and cosmology. The motions, properties and evolution of celestial objects will be discussed using the laws of physics. More detailed analyses will be carried out in research projects (IA). Optional topics include: the history of astronomy, time measurement, space exploration programs, extraterrestrial life, Special and General Relativity. The Integrative Activity and Comprehensive Assessment for the science program will take place in this course. Students who complete CA/IA-Astrophysics are not eligible to take the course Astrophysics (203-BNM-05).

202-BNJ-LWCA/IA - The Chemistry of Biological Molecules

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is an introductory biochemistry course where students will learn about the basic types of biologically important molecules. The course will also include an introduction to many processes where these molecules are involved: muscle contraction, blood clotting, and communication between cells. Finally some current applications of chemistry such as drugs and drug design, forensics, etc. will be studied. The laboratory will introduce the student to basic biochemistry laboratory techniques such as column chromatography, electrophoresis and enzyme assays and kinetics. The Integrative Activity and Comprehensive Assessment for the science program will take place in this course.

202-BNK-LWCA/IA - Chemistry Today

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course will address some of the many ways in which chemistry touches daily life, while equipping the students to find and assess the kinds of information related to chemical technology that will facilitate better personal and political decision-making concerning the uses of this technology. Issues related to science and society and to ethics are a very important part of the discussions. The course is integrative in nature, developing in particular the relationship between Biology and Chemistry, as molecules of biological importance are examined. The specific topics to be addressed include the chemistry of food and cooking, the chemistry of drugs and the chemistry of the environment. The Integrative Activity and Comprehensive Assessment for the science program will take place in this course. Students who complete CA/IA-Chemistry Today are not eligible to take the course Chemistry Today (202-BNK-05).

101-BNL-LWCA/IA Ecology

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

This course is intended to introduce the student to the natural forces that govern relationships between an organism and its physical environment, as well as between organisms sharing an environment. The underlying theme of this course is that these interactions determine the abundance and distribution of organisms on Earth, and that human activities contribute to disrupting natural ecological relationships. Specifically, the course will include the following topics: population dynamics, competition, predation, biodiversity, pollution, overpopulation, habitat destruction. The Integrative Activity and Comprehensive Assessment for the science program will take place in this course. Students who complete CA/IA-Ecology are not eligible to take the course Introduction to Ecology (101-BNL-05).

101-BNM-LWCA/IA Microbiology

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Students will be presented current, real-life examples to illustrate how the science of microbiology can be applied and learn some of the fundamental principles of microbiology needed to understand these examples. Topics will be chosen from three general fields of microbiology: environmental microbiology, food microbiology, and medical microbiology. In addition, the links between social and political issues and microbiology will also be examined. As with all science-option courses, CA/IA-Microbiology will address the fundamental principles of the experimental method. The Integrative Activity and Comprehensive Assessment for the science program will take place in this course. Students who complete CA/IA-Microbiology are not eligible to take the course The Essentials of Microbiology (101-BNM-05).

603-510-LWPop Fiction

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-3

In a variety of works and genres, students will explore the fascinating world of Pop Fiction, the themes and media used for its expression, and the meaning and purpose of Pop Fiction in the postmodern age.

502-410-LWExploring Cultural Diversity

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-3

This course will enable students to compare aspects of contemporary culture between the local Canadian and Québec context and the context of countries associated with one or both of the foreign languages studied in the program (Spanish and/or German). Themes and issues will be approached in Spanish and/or German with the help of examples from the arts, short literary texts and coverage in the media.

602-930-LWProjet créatif

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Dans ce cours, les étudiants devront exploiter leur pensée créatrice en réalisant un projet artistique qui demande persévérance et effort. Ils effectueront des études préparatoires en vue de réaliser leur projet, documenteront leur processus et devront être en mesure de poser un regard critique sur celui-ci. Par la réussite de ce cours, ils démontreront qu’ils sont en mesure d’utiliser la langue française avec aisance.