Back to program page

Mathematics Profile - Social Science

Includes 3 math courses

General Education Courses

603-101-MQIntroduction to College English

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-4

This course will provide the student with the opportunity to make an intensive analysis of short fiction in order to see how it functions as a means of commenting upon human behavior and experience. Specifically, the student will examine such basic concepts of fiction as plot, character, setting, tone, atmosphere, point-of-view and theme. The student will be expected to produce written work and to take part in class discussion. To this end, students should learn to recognize the appropriate use of words, correct syntactical usage, and the coherent development of ideas; students should further learn to develop their own ideas into arguments and theses, to organize them and to edit the final copy.

Humanities - Knowledge

Weighting: 3-1-3

Taking a cue from its title, the Knowledge course is about forms of human knowledge. It is about how to distinguish between belief and knowledge in various domains, and about the method or methods by which human beings gain knowledge. Finally, the Knowledge course looks at how various types of knowledge are organized and used in our everyday and social lives. 

345-101-2QKnowledge (Lecture)

Hours: 60

Weighting: 3-1-3

Lecture Pedagogy: Knowledge Lecture (L) sections are given by means of lecture pedagogy. The teacher lectures about the course content, using different pedagogical devices such as Power Point presentations, board notes, asking students to do smaller group discussions, and study questions. Sometimes students consider a cultural production (film, play) or are asked to attend a guest lecture. Consonant with the goal of the course, students will learn about rational argument as our general means of gaining knowledge and will put this method into practice throughout the course. Students will thus learn to recognize, analyze, evaluate, and use argument in thinking about, reading and writing about human knowledge. Students will also look at how other methods of obtaining knowledge compare to rational argument. Since the course is about human knowledge, individual sections focus on the varieties of human knowledge into which students are being inducted during their CEGEP studies. Knowledge (L) course content includes knowledge issues in mathematics, science, social sciences and commerce, literature and drama, the fine arts and music. Check course outlines for information about specific course content, readings and course material, in any given semester. 

345-101-3QKnowledge (Seminar)

Hours: 60

Weighting: 3-1-3

Seminar Pedagogy: The Knowledge Seminar (S) course distinguishes itself by its seminar pedagogy. Classes consist of round-table discussion seminars in which students are expected to engage with the text under study, and also with other participants in the seminar. The aim is to encourage in students to undertake a critical approach together, to problems of knowledge as they arise in various texts (philosophical, literary, scientific, social scientific, etc.), in order to gain an understanding of, and analyse, problems of knowledge. Knowledge (S) sections take as their subject matter the forms of human knowledge into which students are being inducted during their cégep studies. Discussion topics, as they arise in our texts, might include knowledge issues in mathematics, science, social sciences and commerce, literature and drama, the fine arts and music. Students should look at the course outlines Knowledge (S) courses in any one session for more precise information about course content, readings and material to be studied. In addition, since method itself is a problem of knowledge, the seminar process of argument and discussion engaged in and applied during classes provides yet another subject for participants to reflect upon and discuss.

Physical Activity and Effectiveness

Weighting: 0-2-1

The 109-102-MQ course is designed to improve one’s effectiveness when practicing physical activity.

Concentration Courses

300-300-REPractical Initiation to Methodology in the Social Sciences

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-2

The aim of this introductory and compulsory methodology course is to develop the Social Science student's level of scientific literacy, intellectual rigor, and spirit of scientific inquiry. These goals will be attained by learning basic theoretical concepts of research, improving the student's abilities to read and understand scholarly publication, doing laboratory exercises, using the scientific method in relationship to social science problems, and preparing an empirical research proposal. The student will be introduced to the use of appropriate software in order to present the results of the research project in the form of a research report.

330-910-REIntroduction to Western History

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Understanding who we are and the specific characteristics of Western societies in today's world is the main goal of this course. From the time of the ancient Greeks to the nineteenth century, this course will introduce you to the major events and evolving themes found in the history of Western civilization. While this course addresses great political and economic developments, from the learning of democracy in Ancient Greece to the French Revolution, and from the European sea explorations and conquests to the Industrial Revolution, it also examines the principal elements of the Western intellectual and cultural heritage, such as humanism and individualism, Judeo-Christian values, rationalism and scientific thinking. It also incorporates elements of social history by its attention to women's history, family, values and daily life.

383-920-REIntroduction to Macroeconomics

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Macroeconomics introduces the student to the basic terms, principles and methods of economics, and to their application to the economy, as a whole. In particular, the course focuses on macroeconomic phenomena including the level of output (GDP), economic growth, unemployment, inflation, business cycles, as well as fiscal and monetary policies. Students learn to describe and interpret basic indicators for the Canadian economy and for other economies around the world. Please note that students in Business Administration Technology (410.12) cannot take Macroeconomics as a complementary course as it is a part of the Economics for Business course. However, they can take a second-level economic course as a complementary course, once they have completed Economics for Business, 383-320-LW.

201-103-REDifferential Calculus

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Pre-requisite: Secondary V Mathematics: Technical and Scientific Option (064-506) or Natural Science Option (065-506). This course is a study of change from a mathematical view. Topics covered will include the following: limits and continuity; the definition of the derivative of a function of one variable and the rules for differentiation; implicit differentiation; higher order derivatives; differentials and linear approximations; and l'Hospital's rule. Applications involve curve sketching, maxima and minima, and interpretations of rates of change, and will include problems encountered in the social sciences, especially economics. If you wish to take Math 103 and do not have the necessary high school Math pre-requisites, please read the information on the Math home page (in the Directory for Academic Faculty).

General Education Courses

603-103-MQLiterary Themes in Poetry

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-3

In this course, the student will critically examine literary themes such as: love, nature, war, death, the creative artistic process, the divine. The student will analyze these themes as found in the literary form of poetry, and will therefore also be expected to be familiar with such concepts as rhyme, rhythm and figurative language in its various forms. Besides being able to recognize the literary theme in a poem, the student will see it in its cultural context and as a comment on human values and experience.

Health and Physical activity

Weighting: 1-1-1

 The 109-101-MQ course is designed to analyze one’s physical activity from the standpoint of a healthy lifestyle.

Concentration Courses

360-300-REQuantitative Methods in the Social Sciences

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-2

The Quantitative Methods course introduces the student to the quantitative and statistical procedures used in studying humanity and society. By the end of the course, the student will be able to determine the place of statistics in the Social Sciences, will be familiar with the fundamental concepts and techniques of statistics, will be able to interpret the statistics encountered in the context of social science research as well as in everyday life, will learn how to work with descriptive statistics, and in particular, how to present, analyze, and interpret data using various forms of measurement, and will be introduced to, and learn to work with, at least one inferential statistical technique.

350-102-REIntroduction to Psychology

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Introduction to Psychology is an overview of scientific methodology in the study of human behavior. We examine and study the scientific bases of behavior to increase our awareness and understanding of the factors which interact to explain general human behavior. Such information should make it possible to generalize and apply results to real-world environments and events. The major topics covered in this course are: foundations of modern psychology; areas of specializations and major characteristics of psychological research; the structure and functioning of the nervous system as part of the biological foundations of behavior; perception and attention; learning; the basic elements and processes of memory, thinking and intelligence; the nature and measurement of intelligence; emotion and stress.

201-203-REIntegral Calculus

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Pre-requisites: TS 5 or SN 5 high school math and 201-103-RE. This course centers upon antiderivatives and their uses: integrals of functions of one variable, the fundamental theorem of calculus and methods of integration. Applications involve areas, volumes of revolution, length of a curve, etc. and will include problems encountered in the social sciences. Improper integrals, sequences, series and power series are also considered. Note that business students should verify whether their preferred university requires this course or 201-105-RE (Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry).

Options from First-Level Concentration Courses (Choose 2, but no more than 1 from any discipline)

320-101-LWIntroduction to the Geography of the World

Hours: 45

Weigjjhting: 2-1-3

This course is a general introduction to the planet and its geography. The student will explore some physical, cultural, economic and political aspects of all the regions of the world. For each area, some specific contemporary world issues will be introduced using geographical concepts: region, landscape, culture, resource, environment and scale. Films and PowerPoint presentations are widely used in this course to illustrate the beauties and contrasts of our planet, and will make you want to travel to every corner of the world!

387-101-LWIntroduction to Sociology: The Individual and Society

Hours: 45

Weigjjhting: 2-1-3

Students are introduced to Sociology and its contribution to the understanding of social life and society. The objective is to help students acknowledge that individuals are social beings. This means, among other things, that an individual's experience, actions and identity are conditioned by culture, the lifelong process of socialization, social affiliation, the social construction of gender, and social definitions of deviant behaviour. Students learn about the sociological perspective and use concepts and theories to describe social reality.

385-101-LWIntroduction to Politics

Hours: 45

Weigjjhting: 2-1-3

Students learn to identify and understand the political actors, institutions and ideas that define how power is exercised and how decisions about 'who gets what, when and where' are made in national and international politics. Through the discussion of contemporary issues, students are encouraged to develop an interest in politics and an awareness of the national and international political environment in which they live. Students are initiated to the principal elements of the decision-making process and the policy cycle using examples from the various countries around the world and from international relations. This course provides students with knowledge that is very helpful for studies in law, journalism, communications, international studies or political science. Please note that if you take this course, you cannot take Introduction to Canadian and Quebec Politics (385-110-LW).

385-110-LWIntroduction to Canadian and Quebec Politics

Hours: 45

Weigjjhting: 2-1-3

Students learn to identify and understand the political actors, institutions and ideas that define how power is exercised and how decisions about 'who gets what, when and where' are made in Canada and Quebec. Through the discussion of contemporary issues, students are encouraged to develop an interest in Canadian and Quebec politics. Students learn about such topics as the Canadian constitution, federalism, the parliamentary system, and policy making. The students will learn about the unique character of the Canadian and Quebec political systems by discovering the historical, geographical, economic, social and cultural factors which shaped them. This course provides students with knowledge that is very helpful for studies in law, journalism, communications or political science. Please note that if you take this course, you cannot take Introduction to Politics (385-101-LW)

401-101-LWIntroduction to Business

Hours: 45

Weigjjhting: 2-1-3

This is a foundation course for the program. It introduces students to basic concepts necessary for understanding how a business is organized and operates. While the course focuses on organizations run for profit, the basic notions covered in the course can be applied to other types of organizations. Students are exposed to the notion of systems. The functions of a business are presented as interdependent parts of an overall organizational system that in turn is part of a broader environment, an environment affected by major trends such as globalization. The course covers the functions of management, marketing, human resources, finance/accounting, and production/operations. Students also gain an understanding of the importance of information systems and decision-making approaches to make effective use of information. Ethical considerations are included.

General Education Courses

603-102-MQLiterary Genres

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-3

This course will allow the student to make an intensive analysis of the literary genre of the drama. The principal general purpose of this analysis is to see how drama functions as a unique means of commenting upon the human situation. Furthermore the student will learn to understand a work's relationship to its literary, cultural and historical contexts and sill explicate a work (or works) representative of the genre.

First Required French Course

Weighting: 3-0-3

The level you take will be based on the level of your first French course.

Winter semester

602-BNR-LWFondements de la communication française

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra à l'étudiant d'apprendre à distinguer les caractéristiques formelles des principaux types de textes liés à son champ d'études pour arriver à les commenter. De plus, l'étudiant développera ses compétences afin de rédiger des textes liés à son champ d'études en respectant la structure adéquate de même que le code grammatical. À la fin du cours, l'étudiant devra être en mesure de rédiger un texte de 250 mots lié à son champ d'étude.

602-BNS-LWLangue française et réalité

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours aidera l'étudiant à communiquer en français avec plus d'aisance. À la fin du cours, l'élève devra pouvoir comprendre un texte écrit de 1000 mots et rédiger un texte de 350 mots à l'aide d'une grammaire, d'un dictionnaire et d'un répertoire de verbes.

602-BNT-LWExpression française informative & démonstrative

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours aidera l'étudient à communiquer en français avec aisance dans son champ d'étude particulier autant que possible. Il comprend l'étude des textes d'origines diverses, la rédaction de résumés et la révision de certaines difficultés de la grammaire française.

602-BNU-MQExpression française informative et argumentative

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra à l'étudiant d'écrire une dissertation en français sur un sujet relié à son champ d'études autant que possible. L'étudiant développera de façon plus particulière ses capacités d'analyse et de rédaction, et acquerra les connaissances nécessaires pour produire un bon texte informatif, argumentatif et critique de spectacle ainsi qu'une analyse littéraire. À la fin du cours, l'étudiant devra être en mesure de rédiger des textes de 500 à 750 mots portant sur divers sujets culturels, sociaux ou scientifiques.

602-BNV-LWCommunication écrite

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra aux étudiants de transposer les théories liées à l'analyse littéraire vers les discours sociaux qui les entourent, soit les médias et la publicité. De plus, ils devront améliorer leur maîtrise stylistique et syntaxique afin d'atteindre différents objectifs préétablis.

Humanities - World Views

Weighting: 3-0-3

Whether we are aware of it or not, all of us have internalised, and are guided in our interactions with others by, a perspective on reality – or, a world view.  Our world view is influenced by many things – the family and culture in which we are raised, religious beliefs we might be attached to, the literary and cultural productions of our time and place, the general social, political and economic structures of our society, the power of science and the knowledge it has given us, the historical epoch in which we live, the arts and media. The World Views course seeks to enable students to take a critical-humanistic stance to their view(s) of the world; and to show students that the world is viewed in a multitude of ways, which themselves have multiple sources and influences. In being able to gain critical distance, students should come understand what is thought to be important by holders of a world view and why. Students will gain an understanding of the difficulty of claims to truth related to any one world view; and in so doing, will learn to critically examine how a world view is related to its justification. Ultimately, the World Views course seeks to enable students to critically compare world views from a humanistic perspective, to see which views are justified and on what basis. The point is to broaden students’ perspectives on our shared human reality to help them make intelligent and caring choices in their own personal and social lives.

345-102-2QWorld Views Lecture

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The World Views Lecture (L) course distinguishes itself by means of lecture pedagogy. The teacher lectures about the course content, using different pedagogical devices such as Power Point presentations, board notes, asking students to do smaller group discussions, and study questions. Sometimes students consider a cultural production (film, play) or are asked to attend a guest lecture. Consonant with the goal of the course, lectures are focussed upon the examination of several world views, such as: philosophical, familial-cultural and/or literary-cultural, religious, socio-political and/or economic, scientific or historical. Precise course content and texts chosen vary with the section of the course. Students should check the course outlines in any one semester for more precise information on the content, readings, and course material in different sections.

345-102-3QWorld Views Seminar

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The World Views Seminar (S) course distinguishes itself by its seminar pedagogy. Classes consist of round-table discussion seminars in which students will actively engage with the text under study, and also to engage, by means of reasoned discussion, with other participants in the seminar, including the teacher. By means of such reasoned discussion, students will learn to describe and compare selected world views, to explain some of the major ideas, values and implications of these world views, and to organize them into coherent patterns. The aim of seminar pedagogy in the World Views course is to encourage students to undertake a critical-humanistic approach together to differing perspectives on reality. Students should check the course outlines in any one semester for more precise information on the course content, readings and study materials.

345-102-4QWorld Views: History of Art

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

History of Art: The department also offers more specialized World View Lecture courses in the content areas of Art History. In World Views – History of Art, the teacher lectures about the course content, using mainly PowerPoint presentations, but may ask students to engage in smaller group discussions, work on study questions, or apply theoretical knowledge to visual exercises, namely recognizing artists and their underlying world view by relying on Prezi presentations. Other times students could be asked to attend a guest lecture, or visit a museum. Consonant with the goal of the course, lectures are focussed upon the examination of differing world views as incarnated in art. Different aspects of each world view – whether they be philosophical, familial-cultural and/or literary-cultural, religious, socio-political and/or economic, scientific or historical – will be focused on the artistic movement under study or on the centre of interest of the artist. Precise course content and texts chosen vary with the section of the course. Students should check the course outlines in any one semester for more precise information on the content, readings, and course material in different sections.

Complementary Course (Choose 1)

Weighting: Depends on course

Complementary courses are those in domains outside of your program. For example, students in the Science Program cannot take science or math courses as complementary courses. However, they may take courses in the Social Sciences, Languages, the Creative Arts and Literature and the Business area.

The courses listed below only serve as complementary courses, and they are never taken as concentration courses in any program. Many other courses can be taken as a complementary course if they are not already part of your program. For example, students who are not in the Social Science Program may take any first-level Social Science course, followed by a second-level course in the same discipline. Students who are not in the P.W. Sims Business Program may take Introduction to Business, followed by Accounting I, Business Law or Marketing. Students who are not in the Arts, Literature and Communication (ALC) Program may take Spanish or German courses.  All potential complementary courses will be shown to you when you make your course selection in your Omnivox portal, as long as you have the pre-requisites. If you are unsure about what the pre-requisites for a course are, ask your Academic Advisor.

105-BPE-LWCSI: St. Lawrence

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

CSI: St. Lawrence (Forensics) is designed to accommodate non-science students wishing to learn basic scientific concepts and procedures. This complementary course will permit students to discover the procedures and techniques used in crime scene investigations. Throughout the course students will explore the simple laboratory procedures used to collect and identify criminal evidence. They will learn how to investigate criminal cases, collecting and analyzing the evidence available to solve a crime. 

105-BPF-LWThe Science in Science Fiction

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The Science in Science Fiction is a complementary course designed for students enrolled in programs other than science. The primary objectives of this course are to introduce students to a scientific way of thinking and to help students become more critical of seemingly scientific information. Science fiction movies and one novel will be used to introduce scientific concepts that will be explored in the classroom as well as laboratory settings. Students will learn about the scientific method, genetics, cloning, disease transmission, and global warming and learn to discriminate between the science fact and science fiction in the works such as the following: The Andromeda Strain (novel), Jurassic Park, Outbreak, GATTACA, and The Day After Tomorrow. (Note:  The films will be presented during class time.) Due to the intensive nature of the course, students may not miss any classes. Because of the laboratory component, enrollment must be limited to 28 students.

203-BPG-LWAstronomy

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

If you would like to explore the universe beyond our planet Earth, this course is for you. Starting from what is visible at night to the naked eye, we will investigate the motions, properties and evolution of the moon, the planets, the sun, stars, galaxies... We will also learn about the tools used in the exploration of the distant universe: telescopes, spectroscopes, space probes, etc. There will be a lot of slides and DVDs shown in class. You will also have the opportunity to observe celestial objects “live” through a telescope. “Astronomy” is for non-science students. No knowledge of mathematics will be required beyond what you learned in secondary school.

340-BPE-LWArt and Aesthetics: Drawing

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course considers various forms of art produced by aesthetic practices, including drawing, painting and sculpture. Students will write two papers (of 300 and 750 words) and a final exam. Students will also give a brief oral presentation as well as create at least four large drawings and a number of small sketches. The philosophical aspect of the course will include discussion of the formal and aesthetic qualities of artwork in order to help the students to consider what art is, what one is creating, and why. Various drawing techniques will be presented and their relation to the perception and observation of visual phenomena such as line, edge, light, shadow and perspective. The importance of interpretation and imagination in works of art will be examined. These elements will be explored in visual presentations that will introduce the art of the Renaissance, Baroque and Modern eras. The manual aspect of the course will occur in the studio where the students will be presented with practical approaches to drawing in various media including pencil, charcoal, conté and ink. With personal instruction from the teacher, each student, while learning about the medium, the qualities of the materials, and the potential of the tools, will create at least four large drawings and a number of smaller sketches. The drawings will be exhibited throughout the semester.

340-BPK-03Art and Aesthetics: Painting

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The objective of the course is to create a work of fine art, a painting. There are two aspects to this process. One is the practical studio work where the student will learn about materials, tools and techniques of painting. The other aspect involves the intellectual consideration and discussion of what art is and what one is creating.

365-BPB-LWCareer Planning: Exploring Your Future

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

This course offers students an opportunity to explore a contemporary issue as it relates to a career of interest, developing a good understanding of both. The course allows students to develop possible educational and career paths and to assess their career development process. The course also allows students to study a contemporary issue related to their career of interest, from the perspective a various disciplines. Issues could be related to globalization, ethics, evolving societal values, political-legal factors, economics, etc.

420-BPE-LWComputers Today

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

The objective of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of computer science, computer hardware and popular software and applications used to research and process information. Computer, data and cyber safety issues will be discussed.  The student will be introduced to the terminology, concepts and techniques relevant to information technology.  The student will review the history of computers, networking, the internet, world wide web, e-commerce and social media as well as the impacts that technology has had on entertainment, work, commerce, research, etc.  The student will also discuss the future of computer science and the ramifications now being explored.

420-BPG-LWCommunication and Technology

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

More than ever in the world today, individuals and groups need to communicate ideas and concepts.  Electronic communication tools or electronic support to communication are competencies that need to be mastered to properly evolve in today’s work environments. The objective of this course is to provide students with basic knowledge of computer science, computers and popular software used to efficiently research, analyze and communicate their ideas and concepts.  The student will be introduced to the terminology, concepts and techniques relevant to information technology, with a focus on Microsoft Office. 

603-BPE-LWGothic Literature

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3 (2)

The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to the gothic genre through a study of its origins in the 18th century and its subsequent evolution through time until today. The students will learn what constitutes the gothic and how this genre has affected other types of art. The various recurrent themes found in gothic fiction will be studied, including the issues of sin, madness, mortality and immortality, family dynamics, the belief in the supernatural, superstition, violence, the significance of fantasy and fear, obsession, and the role of gender, race, class and sexuality.

603-BPF-LWMyth, Fantasy and Science Fiction

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3 (2)

The purpose of this course is to study and understand the mythological origins of works of fantasy, science fiction and art. Students will read myths from cultures across the globe and follow the expression of their cultural development in fantasy, science fiction and art. Recurrent themes relevant to works of myth, fantasy, and science fiction will be studied, including issues such as love, death, beauty, truth, evil, mystery, dream, technology, and fear.

603-BPG-LWJournalism and the New Media

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This complementary course contributes to several elements of the General Education Exit Profile. The student will demonstrate a college level proficiency in English in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The student will achieve balance and complementarity in relation to the program specific component.

603-BPU-03Theatre

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

This course centers upon practical theatre work. A short history of theatre is also undertaken and some plays and sections of plays will be looked at from a literary point of view. The primary work in the course involves theatre workshop activities, individual monologue scenes, group scenes, warm-up exercises, and so forth. Naturally, a great deal of participation from the students is necessary. The final examination is practical (acting out a scene alone or with others) and the greatest part of the course grade is based on class participation.

603-BPV-03Creative Writing

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

In this particular course, the artistic field will be based on creativity through writing narrative prose or poetry or drama. Through the study of works of art and/or through experimenting in an artistic medium, students will develop an aesthetic sensibility. This training also aims to teach students the fundamentals of the language of art, and the skills to make connections between the elements of this language. This course is not intended for students who have problems with the English language.

Concentration Courses

201-105-RELinear Algebra and Vector Geometry

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Pre-requisites: TS 5 or SN 5 high school math and 201-103-RE. This course is an introduction to linear algebra. Topics include vectors as directed line segments and in component form, linear dependence, basis, vector spaces and subspaces, dot and cross products, n-tuples as vectors, and vector equations of lines in two-space and of lines and planes in three-space, in addition to matrices: matrix arithmetic and inverses, determinants, and systems of linear equations and matrices, and linear programming. Various applications in social science will be considered. Note that business students should verify whether their preferred university requires this course or 201-203-RE (Integral Calculus).

Options from Second-Level Concentration Courses (Choose 2)

Second-Level Social Science Options

Weigjjhting: Depends on course

Choose 1

101-901-REThe Human Body

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The course, The Human Body, will examine the nervous and endocrine systems at cellular and functional levels to explain how these systems maintain homeostasis within the human body. Once the fundamental physiology of the nervous system has been examined and the basics of the endocrine system have been presented, specific applications will be explored. This year, students will examine the effects upon homeostasis caused by drug addiction, stress, and the human sexual response. A brief discussion of the role of genes and heredity will be incorporated into the topics.

 

201-105-RELinear Algebra and Vector Geometry

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Pre-requisites: TS 5 or SN 5 high school math and 201-103-RE. This course is an introduction to linear algebra. Topics include vectors as directed line segments and in component form, linear dependence, basis, vector spaces and subspaces, dot and cross products, n-tuples as vectors, and vector equations of lines in two-space and of lines and planes in three-space, in addition to matrices: matrix arithmetic and inverses, determinants, and systems of linear equations and matrices, and linear programming. Various applications in social science will be considered. Note that business students should verify whether their preferred university requires this course or 201-203-RE (Integral Calculus).

201-203-REIntegral Calculus

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Pre-requisites: TS 5 or SN 5 high school math and 201-103-RE. This course centers upon antiderivatives and their uses: integrals of functions of one variable, the fundamental theorem of calculus and methods of integration. Applications involve areas, volumes of revolution, length of a curve, etc. and will include problems encountered in the social sciences. Improper integrals, sequences, series and power series are also considered. Note that business students should verify whether their preferred university requires this course or 201-105-RE (Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry).

300-250-LWSocial Sciences and Health

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The main goal of this multidisciplinary course is to understand the significant effects of social factors on life expectancy and health disparities. The social environment substantially modifies health through factors such as early life experiences, poverty, socioeconomic status, social exclusion, work, stress, social support, drugs, food supply, transport, and neighbourhoods. Students will learn to explain how these social factors influence physical health and longevity, and how public policy is key in improving health and reducing a range of social injustices. This course will help students to understand how a social science practitioner can address the health of populations, and more generally how a citizen can contribute to a more just and caring society.

320-255-LWGeography of World Development

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

In a period of globalization where sustainable development principles encourage us to think globally and act locally, geographical knowledge has become a necessity. This course will introduce the students to several different aspects of human development locally and in various parts of the planet. During the course we will explore and analyse the geography of several factors associated with development such as: natural resources, demographics, environmental deterioration (deforestation, water scarcity, and global atmospheric change), energy, food production and transportation, fair trade, and organic food. The course content also involves several short outings (on freshwater, wastewater treatment and waste disposal) and a one-day field trip during which participants will gather real world information on local development. ** Fees may apply for outings**

320-260-LWCultural and Political Geography

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

The goal of this course is to analyse how culture is a cornerstone in the way humans perceive and organise their territory. It is in continuity with the Introduction to Geography of the World course and it involves more in-depth analysis of the world's great cultures through their religions, languages, cuisines, music and arts, non-verbal communication, attitudes and values. More emphasis is given to the First Nations of North America, Europe's amazing mosaic of cultures, the Muslim world, the mountain cultures of the Himalayas, and worldwide minorities. There are several short local outings and a one-day field trip to Montreal during which participants will gather first-hand information on world cultures. ** Fees may apply for outings**

330-250-LWHistory of Contemporary Quebec

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course will enable the student to understand the factors of change and continuity that have determined the structure of Quebec society. Topics to be analysed include the evolution of Quebec from 1867 to the present day on many levels: political (the federal union and Quebec's place in that union, the construction of Quebecers' identity and the growth of provincial autonomy), economic (growth and development in the nineteenth and twentieth century, nationalization), socio-cultural (immigration, cultural diversity, changing lifestyles, artistic and intellectual movements).

330-255-LWHistory of the Contemporary World

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course will analyze the history of the world from about 1800 to the present day. It will broaden the students' understanding of current issues and phenomena through the analysis of selected historical developments of the present era such as the Industrial Revolution, the multiplication of cities, the rise of new ideologies such as Feminism, Socialism, Marxism, Fascism, Internationalism, Neo-Liberalism and Neo-Conservatism, as well as through the study of important conflicts such as the two World Wars, the Bolshevik Revolution or the Cold War. It will also look into the scope of environmental changes and the place of new technologies in contemporary societies.

330-260-LWHistory of Colonial North America

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

During the first age of globalization, when Europeans first arrived in the Americas, two worlds met: the old and the new. The Native Americans who had inhabited the land for millennia clashed with the Spanish, the French, the English and the Dutch as they arrived and founded their colonies. This course examines the period of contact and settlement, as well as the different conflicts and challenges facing the conquerors of the land as they discovered, settled, adapted and prospered in the different colonies of New Spain, New France, New England, the Middle Colonies and the Planter Colonies. The conquerors even forced Africans to settle in their colonies as slaves. This world gradually vanished when some of the colonies broke away from their mother-countries, and gained autonomy and self-determination.

330-265-LWHistory of Canada, 1867 to the present

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Students will analyze the history of Canada from Confederation in 1867 to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the development of Canadian nationhood in its North American context and as part of the contemporary world. Topics to be covered include the Confederation and its causes, the development of the West, social and cultural change, alienation in the Maritimes and the West, the national unity question in Quebec, the rise of conservatism, involvement in world affairs and relations with the United States.

330-270-LWHistory of the United States, 1861 to the present

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

To make sense of the American experience, past and present, is one of the great intellectual challenges of our time. History will help us analyze and understand the social, economic, cultural and political evolution of the United States from the Civil War (1861-1865) to their present status as the major political, economic, military and cultural force in the hemisphere and on the international scene. Topics to be covered include the Civil War, Reconstruction and segregation, the second and third industrial revolutions and their consequences, social and cultural change, reforms at home and abroad, and foreign policy.

330-275-LWHistory of the Middle Ages

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The Fall of the Roman Empire, the rise of Islam, Charlemagne, the Viking invasions, the Catholic Church, the Crusades, William the Conqueror, the Black Death, the Hundred Years War, and the Great Schism are only a few of the medieval events and people who marked Western Europe over the course of one thousand years. This course analyzes the rise and development of Europe during the Middle Ages by exploring political, economic, religious, social, and cultural factors and trends as well as their effects on the medieval population, and on many traits of our civilization.

330-276-LWHistory of Ancient Civilization

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

From China to Africa, from the Middle East to Central and South America, civilization flourished all around the globe. Interestingly, various early civilizations developed a number of similar characteristics regardless of their geographical diversity. This course will explore the key political, economic, social and cultural characteristics of ancient civilizations and through them, illustrate life in the past and analyze the legacy of these ancient worlds to our modern world. Finally, the course will also consider the factors explaining the fall of ancient civilizations.

330-278-LWAncient Greece & Rome: A Comparative and Integrative History

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course will focus on the Ancient Mediterranean, more specifically on the Greek and Roman civilizations. It will analyze the similarities and differences between the Greek and Roman worlds, with an emphasis on the political, social and cultural history of these civilizations. Democracy, republic and empire, citizenship, law and order, gender relations, family and sexuality, religion, death and after-life, these will be some of the themes covered in this class. This course will also explain how the Greek and the Roman worlds collided to produce a unique Greco-Roman synthesis that has found its many expressions in statecraft or mythology, in philosophy or architecture, and which is arguably one of the most important pillars of our Western societies

330-280-LWThe Age of Empires: History and Legacy

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Poverty and hunger, children out of school and lack of access to basic sanitation or to safe drinking water, high prevalence of HIV infections and child mortality, decline in biodiversity or gender disparity, these are some of the problems that plague the developing world today.   Moving away from a Western perspective and bringing to the fore the historical experience of the majority of the world's population, more specifically Africa, Asia and Latin America, this course explores the origins and causes of such problems.  From the fifteenth century to the present day, from the era of European sea explorations through to the many manifestations of imperialism and neo-colonialism, this course will analyze the emergence of, and reactions to, a Western-dominated world, as well as discuss issues of international cooperation and the future of North/South relations. 

330-282-LWA History of Modern China

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

China has long been and still is a mystery. This course will provide an opportunity to students to understand better this complex society and its history. The focus will be on the modern period, from the collapse of the Qing dynasty at the end of the 19th century to the present. We will analyze together historical changes, cultural and social practices, as well as current affairs.

330-285-LWHistory of Sexuality, Women and Family in the Western World

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Women form half of humanity and yet have often been forgotten in the history books. Similarly, most people lead simple lives far from great political upheavals, working day to day, devoting time to their families. This course aims to fill in these gaps by studying the history of women and families from the Classical civilizations to the Modern world. Among many topics, it explores the social, sexual and professional relations that tied men and women, the place and role of women in the society and the economy, and the evolution of the perception and the attitudes towards women, children and sexuality through time.

350-250-LWMental Health

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Mental health is and always has been critical to optimal functioning in life. When mental illness strikes it makes it difficult, if not impossible to benefit from and contribute to society. This course presents topics such as the very contentious question of how to define mental health and mental illness, an issue which fluctuates and reflects social, cultural and political forces present at the time. The various theoretical perspectives such as the psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic, existential, cognitive, neuroscience and sociocultural models of mental health are also explored. The majority of this course, however, focuses on developing an understanding of the various types and categories of mental illness that can afflict people. These include: anxiety disorders (e.g. phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety, post-traumatic distress), somatoform and dissociative disorders (e.g. "multiple personality disorder," hypochondriasis), mood disorders (e.g. depression, "manic-depression"), eating disorders (e.g. anorexia, bulimia, binge-eating), substance-related disorders, personality disorders (e.g. narcissistic, antisocial), schizophrenia and childhood disorders (e.g. autism, conduct disorder). In addition, current diagnostic procedures, research methods and, of course, treatments will be discussed.

350-255-LWDevelopmental Psychology

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The purpose of this course is to build on concepts and skills acquired in Introduction to Psychology through an analysis of the process of human development across the life-span. Students will analyse a variety of dimensions of human development from infancy to old age, with special attention given to the interaction of environmental (e.g., culture) and inborn (e.g., genes) determinants of change. The dimensions include physical growth, cognition, language, attachment, gender roles, moral development, achievement, and personality.

350-260-LWSocial Psychology and the Environment

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Social Psychology is about how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by other people. Social psychology shows how much more we are determined by our environment that we think. Topics include attitudes, persuasion, influence, conformity, aggression, helping, prejudice, discrimination, groups among others.

350-265-LWPsychology of Sexual Behavior

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

This course is about sex! The material we see consolidates and builds on knowledge acquired in the Introduction to Psychology course. We look at how the scientific methods and theoretical perspectives seen at the introductory level are applied to this specialized area of study in the discipline of psychology. Main themes addressed in the course include diversity (e.g., how cultural traditions and standards influence things like social/gender roles and sexual conduct), critical thinking (e.g., how to make sense of the abundance of information about sexuality and gender presented by politicians, theologians, community leaders, radio, film, videos, TV, the Internet, and other sources), responsible sexual decision making and sexual health. These themes will surface throughout the course as the following topics are addressed: (1) what is human sexuality and how do we study it?; (2) female and male sexual function and response (anatomy and physiology); (3) gender identity and gender roles; (4) attraction and love; (5) relationships, intimacy and communication; (6) sexual orientation; (7) sexual dysfunctions and their treatments; (8) sexually transmitted infections; (9) atypical sexual variations; (10) sexual coercion; and (11) commercial sex. The course will address timely issues such as sexual harassment, interfaith couples, contraception, acquaintance sexual assault and the threat of AIDS.

350-270-LWPsychology and the Law

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

If you like legal issues, shows like CSI, Criminal Minds and Law and Order, you may well be interested by the topics we look at in this course. In this course, we look at the interface between law and psychology. Topics include Canadian laws and legal system, psycho-legal research, police investigations, memory and eyewitness testimony, jury selection and decision-making, sentencing and parole, competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, violence and risk assessment, the use of children as witnesses, civil commitment and civil competence, the psychologist/psychiatrist as expert witness, pre-trial publicity, and ethics are also among topics that will explored.

350-285-LWAdvanced Topics in Psychology

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

In this course, students will explore selected topics in psychology at a more advanced level. Building upon the content of the Introduction to Psychology course, it will focus on using scientific thinking while addressing psychological issues. Current topics, events and cases will be used in order to help students apply psychological concepts, models and theories such as the biology of behavior (evolution, genetics, neuroscience), consciousness and free will, drugs, thinking, motivation, self-change, etc.

360-255-LWQuantitative Methods of Social Sciences II

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Social Sciences students wishing to pursue university studies in psychology need to complete the statistical background given them in Quantitative Methods (360-300-RE). This course provides those missing elements. Thus prepared, students will be able to better understand the concepts behind the statistics with which they will have to deal.

383-255-LWMicroeconomics

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Microeconomics builds on the notions of incentives, marginal analysis, demand, supply and markets first introduced in Macroeconomics (383-920-RE). Students will develop a deeper understanding of how markets work, why markets sometimes fail to ensure efficient resource use and what can be done about it, especially by government. In addition to studying the economic behaviour of firms and consumers, students will learn about elasticity, externalities, public goods, production costs, and competitive and non-competitive market structures. Students use the economic concepts and theories to analyse real-world examples mainly drawn from current events. This course is required for students in the Commerce Profile.

383-260-LWContemporary Economic Issues

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course shows students how economic analysis can enlighten societal understanding of a wide variety of issues and the possible solutions. Students apply basic economic concepts and theories to address questions regarding the economics of poverty and income redistribution, education, health care, the environment, labour markets, professional sports, immigration and discrimination. The effects of government policies on legal and illegal markets are also studied. For each theme in this course, students will begin by learning about the issues through available real-world data. They will learn how to use basic economic notions to deepen their understanding of these issues, economic myths and realities.

383-270-LWEnvironmental Economics

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Environmental Economics is a field of economics that undertakes theoretical or empirical studies of the effects of environmental policies on social welfare. Particular issues include air pollution, water quality, resources depletion, global warming, cost-benefit analysis, social efficiency, environmental policies, policy mechanism design, intergenerational equity and sustainable development. Throughout the course, students are introduced to the analytical tools required to design and evaluate public policies toward the environment. By the end of it, they will be able to data and theory to debate why they are for or against an environmental policy. They will also acknowledge the role of governments and collective choices as guardians of social welfare. In this sense, the course reconnects with the humanistic tradition of economics as a social science.

383-280-LWInternational Economic Relations

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course will enable students to understand and analyse the main characteristics of the contemporary international economic order. The course begins with an overview of the contradictory pressures towards globalisation and localisation and their consequences. Students develop a critical understanding of trade theories. They learn to use economic data to analyse and compare international trade patterns and the macroeconomic conditions including quality of life indicators in various countries by income group. Topics covered will include globalization, trade theory, trade liberalisation, protectionism, exchange rates, multinational corporations, the international monetary system, the roles of international organisations, and preferential trade agreements (e.g. NAFTA and the EU). This course is very useful to students who go to university programs in Economics, Business Administration, Political Science, International Studies, International Development and Law.

383-285-LWChallenges and Paths to Economic Development

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course focuses on the economics of sustainable, international development. Students will learn how to apply the main theories of development and underdevelopment to real-life situations. They will engage in a critical examination of the evolution of economic, political and social thought on economic development, notably the ways to improve the standard of living and to reduce global poverty. By examining case studies of countries with successful and unsuccessful development initiatives, students will acquire a critical appreciation of the diverse paths to development and the many challenges that countries face. Topics that will be covered usually include the following: 1.) the millennium development goals, measuring world poverty and progress toward poverty reduction: 2.) the roles of national and international institutions in development; 3.) international aid and its effectiveness; 4.) international trade and its effects on development; and 5.) the environmental impact of development.

385-280-LWInternational Relations

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

In this course, students learn to apply the key concepts, approaches and theories of international relations. The topics covered include the power structure of the international political system, the challenges of global interdependency, national interest and foreign policy, war and conflict resolution, the development of international law and justice, the role and function of international institutions such as the United Nations, and the rise of other political actors in global politics such as non-governmental organizations, international organizations and non-state actors including terrorist groups.

385-290-LWPolitics around the World

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course takes students on a guided tour of a selection of political systems. Students compare and contrast the political development, the institutions and the contemporary challenges facing democratic and non-democratic states from the developed and the developing world. The course will also help students develop their awareness of the different approaches to power-sharing between majority and minority groups in countries. Depending on the semesters, students will be invited to explore the politics of countries such as the United Kingdom, India, Canada, the USA, South Africa, Nigeria, Mexico, Brazil, Russia, China, and Iran.

385-295-LWHuman Rights in Law and Politics

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Students develop a critical awareness of the normative, legal and political foundations of human rights in national and international affairs. Through the empirical study of human rights, students examine the current and past practice of human rights around the world as well as the various institutions (such as treaties, conventions, courts, tribunals) and groups that promote human rights. The rights of minorities, women, children, the disabled, and indigenous peoples will be examined. This course also covers violations of human rights (such as discrimination, state repression, and human trafficking) and how national and international actors measure, monitor and protect human rights. Students will use primary documents, secondary statistics, and secondary sources to analyze case studies, to evaluate UN country reports and to prepare their term project. They will learn where to locate pertinent information on human rights and how to use this information for complaints, alternative dispute resolution and advocacy.

387-255-LWSociology of Media and Popular Culture

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

We as social beings are consumers and producers of culture. In this course, you will have the opportunity to analyze culture, with particular emphasis on popular culture, and the impact it has on the individual and society at large. You will also learn about the social construction of reality and the various social messages the mass media communicates to people, such as its influence on gender roles and socialization, the construction of identity, and views on deviance and crime.

387-260-LWSociology of Contemporary Issues and Social Change

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The focus of the course will be to analyze contemporary events and structural dimensions of the society in the light of sociological theories and perspectives. Students will be expected to follow events related to contemporary social issues in the media, with special emphasis on the electronic media. We will look closely at collective behaviour, the causes and processes of change, and competing ideologies of change.

387-265-LWSociology of Helping Professions

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

What makes people want to help others? Are you interested in working in a profession where you help other people? This course will enable you to learn about helping by studying philosophies about helping, health issues, medical sociology, social stratification and cultural competency. In other words, you will learn about helping in a profession, and you will also learn about the social reality of individuals who seek help.

387-280-LWSociology of Global Power and Communications

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

In this course you will learn about the various influences of globalization and the resulting impact on societies. Various topics include the following: the role of the mass media, the various forms of power, the role of powerful countries in international affairs and the social impact of multinational or transnational corporations. You will also study the link between sociology and human rights issues, environmental issues and social change.

401-255-LWAccounting I

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course provides the basis for all subsequent studies in accounting and finance. Students are introduced to the context of the accounting function, including its role, the importance of standard-setting, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), ethics and career opportunities. Students learn to record information using a synoptic journal as well as a system of journals, ledgers and trial balances. The information to be recorded includes regular transactions, adjusting entries, closing entries, correcting entries and reversing entries. Approaches to documentation in the recording process are introduced. Students also learn to report information in standard financial statements for a proprietorship, including a balance sheet, income statement and statement of owner's equity. The course includes an introduction to the drafting of notes to financial statements. Students have an opportunity to record and report information using an accounting software package, and they are exposed to the process of system modification. The course also introduces the interpretation of financial information using ratio analysis.

401-260-LWMarketing

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course situates marketing in its broader context as a link between external customers and the various functions of a business. Students learn how to segment and select markets, develop an appropriate "marketing mix" (combining product, price, place and promotion) and apply marketing knowledge to better understand and serve customers. Special emphasis is placed on supporting customer service, sales and marketing research activities. Students also have an opportunity to consider ethical aspects of marketing, the context of globalization and opportunities arising from technologies.

401-265-LWBusiness Law

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course deals with the legal aspects of commercial activities affected by provincial and federal legislation and regulations. The areas covered include business ownership, contracts, civil liability, successions, bankruptcy and insolvency. Students learn how to find and consult relevant legal information, identify and apply pertinent legal principles and recognize the consequences of not respecting legal responsibilities.

General Education Courses

603-BNR-LWLong Fiction

Hours: 60

Weighting: 2-2-2

In this course, students will study the novel as a means of commenting on the human condition. Furthermore, student will learn how a work is related to its literary, cultural and historical contexts and will explicate works representative of the genre. Thematic approaches appropriate for Science students, ALC students, Business students and Social Science students will be examined. Fiction as a mirror of the world in general and in terms of the students’ pre-university programs of studies will be included.

First Required French Course

Weighting: 3-0-3

The level you take will be based on the level of your first French course.

Winter semester

602-BNR-LWFondements de la communication française

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra à l'étudiant d'apprendre à distinguer les caractéristiques formelles des principaux types de textes liés à son champ d'études pour arriver à les commenter. De plus, l'étudiant développera ses compétences afin de rédiger des textes liés à son champ d'études en respectant la structure adéquate de même que le code grammatical. À la fin du cours, l'étudiant devra être en mesure de rédiger un texte de 250 mots lié à son champ d'étude.

602-BNS-LWLangue française et réalité

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours aidera l'étudiant à communiquer en français avec plus d'aisance. À la fin du cours, l'élève devra pouvoir comprendre un texte écrit de 1000 mots et rédiger un texte de 350 mots à l'aide d'une grammaire, d'un dictionnaire et d'un répertoire de verbes.

602-BNT-LWExpression française informative & démonstrative

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours aidera l'étudient à communiquer en français avec aisance dans son champ d'étude particulier autant que possible. Il comprend l'étude des textes d'origines diverses, la rédaction de résumés et la révision de certaines difficultés de la grammaire française.

602-BNU-MQExpression française informative et argumentative

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra à l'étudiant d'écrire une dissertation en français sur un sujet relié à son champ d'études autant que possible. L'étudiant développera de façon plus particulière ses capacités d'analyse et de rédaction, et acquerra les connaissances nécessaires pour produire un bon texte informatif, argumentatif et critique de spectacle ainsi qu'une analyse littéraire. À la fin du cours, l'étudiant devra être en mesure de rédiger des textes de 500 à 750 mots portant sur divers sujets culturels, sociaux ou scientifiques.

602-BNV-LWCommunication écrite

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

Ce cours permettra aux étudiants de transposer les théories liées à l'analyse littéraire vers les discours sociaux qui les entourent, soit les médias et la publicité. De plus, ils devront améliorer leur maîtrise stylistique et syntaxique afin d'atteindre différents objectifs préétablis.

Humanities - Ethics (Pre-University)

Weighting: 3-0-3

In general, ethics deals with theories of value and issues and policy questions concerning values. Ethics as a subject considers important and wide-reaching questions concerning human thought, human action and interaction, human conduct with other humans, other beings and the world. Some questions concerned are: “What is the nature of ethical value?”; “What are our values based on?”; “Are there any universal, a-historical values?”; “What are different viewpoints concerning ethical issues and value problems?”; and “How can human beings consider these questions and issues rationally”? Because ethics is primarily about values (as opposed to facts), it is studied in the humanities; historically-speaking, it is a major branch of philosophy. In this particular ethics course, students learn “to apply a critical thought process to ethical issues relevant to their field of study.” The ethics course is designed to introduce students to ethical issues and engage them in a reflection on them. The course situates ethical issues in their world views and deals with the kinds of knowledge they involve. Major ideas, values and social implications of various ethical issues are explained and organized into coherent patterns.

 

345-BNR-23

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The Ethics Lecture (L) sections are distinguished by means of lecture pedagogy. The teacher lectures about the course content, using different pedagogical devices such as PowerPoint presentations, board notes, smaller group discussions, and study questions. Sometimes students consider a cultural production (film, play) or are asked to attend a guest lecture. In keeping with ministerial guidelines, the department offers one more content-specific course. Ethics (L) Business Administration Technology is designed to engage students in reflection on issues related to the present business world.

345-BNR-33

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The Ethics Seminar (S) sections are distinguished by means of seminar pedagogy. Classes are round-table discussion seminars in which students are expected to engage in reasoned discussion with other students and with their teacher. These discussions are focussed upon specific readings which raise different ethical theories, issues, questions and judgments. The method of reasoned discussion in seminar is meant to complement the textual reflections themselves, and to aid students in developing a critical-humanistic approach to the bases for their own ethical view points and judgments.

Physical Activity and Autonomy

Weighting: 1-1-1

The 109-103-MQ course is designed to demonstrate one’s ability to assume responsibility for maintaining a healthy lifestyle through the continued practice of physical activity.

Complementary Course (Choose 1)

Weighting: Depends on course

Complementary courses are those in domains outside of your program. For example, students in the Science Program cannot take science or math courses as complementary courses. However, they may take courses in the Social Sciences, Languages, the Creative Arts and Literature and the Business area.

The courses listed below only serve as complementary courses, and they are never taken as concentration courses in any program. Many other courses can be taken as a complementary course if they are not already part of your program. For example, students who are not in the Social Science Program may take any first-level Social Science course, followed by a second-level course in the same discipline. Students who are not in the P.W. Sims Business Program may take Introduction to Business, followed by Accounting I, Business Law or Marketing. Students who are not in the Arts, Literature and Communication (ALC) Program may take Spanish or German courses.  All potential complementary courses will be shown to you when you make your course selection in your Omnivox portal, as long as you have the pre-requisites. If you are unsure about what the pre-requisites for a course are, ask your Academic Advisor.

105-BPE-LWCSI: St. Lawrence

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

CSI: St. Lawrence (Forensics) is designed to accommodate non-science students wishing to learn basic scientific concepts and procedures. This complementary course will permit students to discover the procedures and techniques used in crime scene investigations. Throughout the course students will explore the simple laboratory procedures used to collect and identify criminal evidence. They will learn how to investigate criminal cases, collecting and analyzing the evidence available to solve a crime. 

105-BPF-LWThe Science in Science Fiction

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The Science in Science Fiction is a complementary course designed for students enrolled in programs other than science. The primary objectives of this course are to introduce students to a scientific way of thinking and to help students become more critical of seemingly scientific information. Science fiction movies and one novel will be used to introduce scientific concepts that will be explored in the classroom as well as laboratory settings. Students will learn about the scientific method, genetics, cloning, disease transmission, and global warming and learn to discriminate between the science fact and science fiction in the works such as the following: The Andromeda Strain (novel), Jurassic Park, Outbreak, GATTACA, and The Day After Tomorrow. (Note:  The films will be presented during class time.) Due to the intensive nature of the course, students may not miss any classes. Because of the laboratory component, enrollment must be limited to 28 students.

203-BPG-LWAstronomy

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

If you would like to explore the universe beyond our planet Earth, this course is for you. Starting from what is visible at night to the naked eye, we will investigate the motions, properties and evolution of the moon, the planets, the sun, stars, galaxies... We will also learn about the tools used in the exploration of the distant universe: telescopes, spectroscopes, space probes, etc. There will be a lot of slides and DVDs shown in class. You will also have the opportunity to observe celestial objects “live” through a telescope. “Astronomy” is for non-science students. No knowledge of mathematics will be required beyond what you learned in secondary school.

340-BPE-LWArt and Aesthetics: Drawing

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course considers various forms of art produced by aesthetic practices, including drawing, painting and sculpture. Students will write two papers (of 300 and 750 words) and a final exam. Students will also give a brief oral presentation as well as create at least four large drawings and a number of small sketches. The philosophical aspect of the course will include discussion of the formal and aesthetic qualities of artwork in order to help the students to consider what art is, what one is creating, and why. Various drawing techniques will be presented and their relation to the perception and observation of visual phenomena such as line, edge, light, shadow and perspective. The importance of interpretation and imagination in works of art will be examined. These elements will be explored in visual presentations that will introduce the art of the Renaissance, Baroque and Modern eras. The manual aspect of the course will occur in the studio where the students will be presented with practical approaches to drawing in various media including pencil, charcoal, conté and ink. With personal instruction from the teacher, each student, while learning about the medium, the qualities of the materials, and the potential of the tools, will create at least four large drawings and a number of smaller sketches. The drawings will be exhibited throughout the semester.

340-BPK-03Art and Aesthetics: Painting

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

The objective of the course is to create a work of fine art, a painting. There are two aspects to this process. One is the practical studio work where the student will learn about materials, tools and techniques of painting. The other aspect involves the intellectual consideration and discussion of what art is and what one is creating.

365-BPB-LWCareer Planning: Exploring Your Future

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

This course offers students an opportunity to explore a contemporary issue as it relates to a career of interest, developing a good understanding of both. The course allows students to develop possible educational and career paths and to assess their career development process. The course also allows students to study a contemporary issue related to their career of interest, from the perspective a various disciplines. Issues could be related to globalization, ethics, evolving societal values, political-legal factors, economics, etc.

420-BPE-LWComputers Today

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

The objective of this course is to provide students with a basic knowledge of computer science, computer hardware and popular software and applications used to research and process information. Computer, data and cyber safety issues will be discussed.  The student will be introduced to the terminology, concepts and techniques relevant to information technology.  The student will review the history of computers, networking, the internet, world wide web, e-commerce and social media as well as the impacts that technology has had on entertainment, work, commerce, research, etc.  The student will also discuss the future of computer science and the ramifications now being explored.

420-BPG-LWCommunication and Technology

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

More than ever in the world today, individuals and groups need to communicate ideas and concepts.  Electronic communication tools or electronic support to communication are competencies that need to be mastered to properly evolve in today’s work environments. The objective of this course is to provide students with basic knowledge of computer science, computers and popular software used to efficiently research, analyze and communicate their ideas and concepts.  The student will be introduced to the terminology, concepts and techniques relevant to information technology, with a focus on Microsoft Office. 

603-BPE-LWGothic Literature

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3 (2)

The purpose of this course is to introduce the students to the gothic genre through a study of its origins in the 18th century and its subsequent evolution through time until today. The students will learn what constitutes the gothic and how this genre has affected other types of art. The various recurrent themes found in gothic fiction will be studied, including the issues of sin, madness, mortality and immortality, family dynamics, the belief in the supernatural, superstition, violence, the significance of fantasy and fear, obsession, and the role of gender, race, class and sexuality.

603-BPF-LWMyth, Fantasy and Science Fiction

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3 (2)

The purpose of this course is to study and understand the mythological origins of works of fantasy, science fiction and art. Students will read myths from cultures across the globe and follow the expression of their cultural development in fantasy, science fiction and art. Recurrent themes relevant to works of myth, fantasy, and science fiction will be studied, including issues such as love, death, beauty, truth, evil, mystery, dream, technology, and fear.

603-BPG-LWJournalism and the New Media

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This complementary course contributes to several elements of the General Education Exit Profile. The student will demonstrate a college level proficiency in English in the areas of reading, writing, speaking, and listening. The student will achieve balance and complementarity in relation to the program specific component.

603-BPU-03Theatre

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

This course centers upon practical theatre work. A short history of theatre is also undertaken and some plays and sections of plays will be looked at from a literary point of view. The primary work in the course involves theatre workshop activities, individual monologue scenes, group scenes, warm-up exercises, and so forth. Naturally, a great deal of participation from the students is necessary. The final examination is practical (acting out a scene alone or with others) and the greatest part of the course grade is based on class participation.

603-BPV-03Creative Writing

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

In this particular course, the artistic field will be based on creativity through writing narrative prose or poetry or drama. Through the study of works of art and/or through experimenting in an artistic medium, students will develop an aesthetic sensibility. This training also aims to teach students the fundamentals of the language of art, and the skills to make connections between the elements of this language. This course is not intended for students who have problems with the English language.

Concentration Courses

300-301-REIntegrative Activity (Social Science)

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

In many ways, the Senior Research Paper is a rite of passage for prospective graduates. Students must demonstrate their individual ability to integrate the knowledge, skills and attitudes developed throughout their program including their ability to synthesize data and their proficiency in using appropriate technological tools. This is done by preparing and presenting, both orally and in writing, a Social Science research essay that uses scholarly sources in English and in French and that incorporates at least two disciplinary perspectives. Students must also demonstrate their ability to think critically about social issues, scientific literature, and their own progress in achieving the educational goals of the program. Consequently, the Senior Research Paper also serves as the comprehensive assessment (épreuve synthèse) required of Social Sciences and Commerce students at the conclusion of their program.

Option from Second-Level Concentration Courses (Choose 1)

Second-Level Social Science Options

Weigjjhting: Depends on course

Choose 1

101-901-REThe Human Body

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The course, The Human Body, will examine the nervous and endocrine systems at cellular and functional levels to explain how these systems maintain homeostasis within the human body. Once the fundamental physiology of the nervous system has been examined and the basics of the endocrine system have been presented, specific applications will be explored. This year, students will examine the effects upon homeostasis caused by drug addiction, stress, and the human sexual response. A brief discussion of the role of genes and heredity will be incorporated into the topics.

 

201-105-RELinear Algebra and Vector Geometry

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Pre-requisites: TS 5 or SN 5 high school math and 201-103-RE. This course is an introduction to linear algebra. Topics include vectors as directed line segments and in component form, linear dependence, basis, vector spaces and subspaces, dot and cross products, n-tuples as vectors, and vector equations of lines in two-space and of lines and planes in three-space, in addition to matrices: matrix arithmetic and inverses, determinants, and systems of linear equations and matrices, and linear programming. Various applications in social science will be considered. Note that business students should verify whether their preferred university requires this course or 201-203-RE (Integral Calculus).

201-203-REIntegral Calculus

Hours: 75

Weighting: 3-2-3

Pre-requisites: TS 5 or SN 5 high school math and 201-103-RE. This course centers upon antiderivatives and their uses: integrals of functions of one variable, the fundamental theorem of calculus and methods of integration. Applications involve areas, volumes of revolution, length of a curve, etc. and will include problems encountered in the social sciences. Improper integrals, sequences, series and power series are also considered. Note that business students should verify whether their preferred university requires this course or 201-105-RE (Linear Algebra and Vector Geometry).

300-250-LWSocial Sciences and Health

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The main goal of this multidisciplinary course is to understand the significant effects of social factors on life expectancy and health disparities. The social environment substantially modifies health through factors such as early life experiences, poverty, socioeconomic status, social exclusion, work, stress, social support, drugs, food supply, transport, and neighbourhoods. Students will learn to explain how these social factors influence physical health and longevity, and how public policy is key in improving health and reducing a range of social injustices. This course will help students to understand how a social science practitioner can address the health of populations, and more generally how a citizen can contribute to a more just and caring society.

320-255-LWGeography of World Development

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

In a period of globalization where sustainable development principles encourage us to think globally and act locally, geographical knowledge has become a necessity. This course will introduce the students to several different aspects of human development locally and in various parts of the planet. During the course we will explore and analyse the geography of several factors associated with development such as: natural resources, demographics, environmental deterioration (deforestation, water scarcity, and global atmospheric change), energy, food production and transportation, fair trade, and organic food. The course content also involves several short outings (on freshwater, wastewater treatment and waste disposal) and a one-day field trip during which participants will gather real world information on local development. ** Fees may apply for outings**

320-260-LWCultural and Political Geography

Hours: 45

Weighting: 1-2-3

The goal of this course is to analyse how culture is a cornerstone in the way humans perceive and organise their territory. It is in continuity with the Introduction to Geography of the World course and it involves more in-depth analysis of the world's great cultures through their religions, languages, cuisines, music and arts, non-verbal communication, attitudes and values. More emphasis is given to the First Nations of North America, Europe's amazing mosaic of cultures, the Muslim world, the mountain cultures of the Himalayas, and worldwide minorities. There are several short local outings and a one-day field trip to Montreal during which participants will gather first-hand information on world cultures. ** Fees may apply for outings**

330-250-LWHistory of Contemporary Quebec

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course will enable the student to understand the factors of change and continuity that have determined the structure of Quebec society. Topics to be analysed include the evolution of Quebec from 1867 to the present day on many levels: political (the federal union and Quebec's place in that union, the construction of Quebecers' identity and the growth of provincial autonomy), economic (growth and development in the nineteenth and twentieth century, nationalization), socio-cultural (immigration, cultural diversity, changing lifestyles, artistic and intellectual movements).

330-255-LWHistory of the Contemporary World

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course will analyze the history of the world from about 1800 to the present day. It will broaden the students' understanding of current issues and phenomena through the analysis of selected historical developments of the present era such as the Industrial Revolution, the multiplication of cities, the rise of new ideologies such as Feminism, Socialism, Marxism, Fascism, Internationalism, Neo-Liberalism and Neo-Conservatism, as well as through the study of important conflicts such as the two World Wars, the Bolshevik Revolution or the Cold War. It will also look into the scope of environmental changes and the place of new technologies in contemporary societies.

330-260-LWHistory of Colonial North America

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

During the first age of globalization, when Europeans first arrived in the Americas, two worlds met: the old and the new. The Native Americans who had inhabited the land for millennia clashed with the Spanish, the French, the English and the Dutch as they arrived and founded their colonies. This course examines the period of contact and settlement, as well as the different conflicts and challenges facing the conquerors of the land as they discovered, settled, adapted and prospered in the different colonies of New Spain, New France, New England, the Middle Colonies and the Planter Colonies. The conquerors even forced Africans to settle in their colonies as slaves. This world gradually vanished when some of the colonies broke away from their mother-countries, and gained autonomy and self-determination.

330-265-LWHistory of Canada, 1867 to the present

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Students will analyze the history of Canada from Confederation in 1867 to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the development of Canadian nationhood in its North American context and as part of the contemporary world. Topics to be covered include the Confederation and its causes, the development of the West, social and cultural change, alienation in the Maritimes and the West, the national unity question in Quebec, the rise of conservatism, involvement in world affairs and relations with the United States.

330-270-LWHistory of the United States, 1861 to the present

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

To make sense of the American experience, past and present, is one of the great intellectual challenges of our time. History will help us analyze and understand the social, economic, cultural and political evolution of the United States from the Civil War (1861-1865) to their present status as the major political, economic, military and cultural force in the hemisphere and on the international scene. Topics to be covered include the Civil War, Reconstruction and segregation, the second and third industrial revolutions and their consequences, social and cultural change, reforms at home and abroad, and foreign policy.

330-275-LWHistory of the Middle Ages

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The Fall of the Roman Empire, the rise of Islam, Charlemagne, the Viking invasions, the Catholic Church, the Crusades, William the Conqueror, the Black Death, the Hundred Years War, and the Great Schism are only a few of the medieval events and people who marked Western Europe over the course of one thousand years. This course analyzes the rise and development of Europe during the Middle Ages by exploring political, economic, religious, social, and cultural factors and trends as well as their effects on the medieval population, and on many traits of our civilization.

330-276-LWHistory of Ancient Civilization

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

From China to Africa, from the Middle East to Central and South America, civilization flourished all around the globe. Interestingly, various early civilizations developed a number of similar characteristics regardless of their geographical diversity. This course will explore the key political, economic, social and cultural characteristics of ancient civilizations and through them, illustrate life in the past and analyze the legacy of these ancient worlds to our modern world. Finally, the course will also consider the factors explaining the fall of ancient civilizations.

330-278-LWAncient Greece & Rome: A Comparative and Integrative History

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course will focus on the Ancient Mediterranean, more specifically on the Greek and Roman civilizations. It will analyze the similarities and differences between the Greek and Roman worlds, with an emphasis on the political, social and cultural history of these civilizations. Democracy, republic and empire, citizenship, law and order, gender relations, family and sexuality, religion, death and after-life, these will be some of the themes covered in this class. This course will also explain how the Greek and the Roman worlds collided to produce a unique Greco-Roman synthesis that has found its many expressions in statecraft or mythology, in philosophy or architecture, and which is arguably one of the most important pillars of our Western societies

330-280-LWThe Age of Empires: History and Legacy

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Poverty and hunger, children out of school and lack of access to basic sanitation or to safe drinking water, high prevalence of HIV infections and child mortality, decline in biodiversity or gender disparity, these are some of the problems that plague the developing world today.   Moving away from a Western perspective and bringing to the fore the historical experience of the majority of the world's population, more specifically Africa, Asia and Latin America, this course explores the origins and causes of such problems.  From the fifteenth century to the present day, from the era of European sea explorations through to the many manifestations of imperialism and neo-colonialism, this course will analyze the emergence of, and reactions to, a Western-dominated world, as well as discuss issues of international cooperation and the future of North/South relations. 

330-282-LWA History of Modern China

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

China has long been and still is a mystery. This course will provide an opportunity to students to understand better this complex society and its history. The focus will be on the modern period, from the collapse of the Qing dynasty at the end of the 19th century to the present. We will analyze together historical changes, cultural and social practices, as well as current affairs.

330-285-LWHistory of Sexuality, Women and Family in the Western World

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Women form half of humanity and yet have often been forgotten in the history books. Similarly, most people lead simple lives far from great political upheavals, working day to day, devoting time to their families. This course aims to fill in these gaps by studying the history of women and families from the Classical civilizations to the Modern world. Among many topics, it explores the social, sexual and professional relations that tied men and women, the place and role of women in the society and the economy, and the evolution of the perception and the attitudes towards women, children and sexuality through time.

350-250-LWMental Health

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Mental health is and always has been critical to optimal functioning in life. When mental illness strikes it makes it difficult, if not impossible to benefit from and contribute to society. This course presents topics such as the very contentious question of how to define mental health and mental illness, an issue which fluctuates and reflects social, cultural and political forces present at the time. The various theoretical perspectives such as the psychodynamic, behavioral, humanistic, existential, cognitive, neuroscience and sociocultural models of mental health are also explored. The majority of this course, however, focuses on developing an understanding of the various types and categories of mental illness that can afflict people. These include: anxiety disorders (e.g. phobias, obsessive-compulsive disorder, generalized anxiety, post-traumatic distress), somatoform and dissociative disorders (e.g. "multiple personality disorder," hypochondriasis), mood disorders (e.g. depression, "manic-depression"), eating disorders (e.g. anorexia, bulimia, binge-eating), substance-related disorders, personality disorders (e.g. narcissistic, antisocial), schizophrenia and childhood disorders (e.g. autism, conduct disorder). In addition, current diagnostic procedures, research methods and, of course, treatments will be discussed.

350-255-LWDevelopmental Psychology

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The purpose of this course is to build on concepts and skills acquired in Introduction to Psychology through an analysis of the process of human development across the life-span. Students will analyse a variety of dimensions of human development from infancy to old age, with special attention given to the interaction of environmental (e.g., culture) and inborn (e.g., genes) determinants of change. The dimensions include physical growth, cognition, language, attachment, gender roles, moral development, achievement, and personality.

350-260-LWSocial Psychology and the Environment

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Social Psychology is about how people's thoughts, feelings, and behaviors are influenced by other people. Social psychology shows how much more we are determined by our environment that we think. Topics include attitudes, persuasion, influence, conformity, aggression, helping, prejudice, discrimination, groups among others.

350-265-LWPsychology of Sexual Behavior

Hours: 45

Weighting: 3-0-3

This course is about sex! The material we see consolidates and builds on knowledge acquired in the Introduction to Psychology course. We look at how the scientific methods and theoretical perspectives seen at the introductory level are applied to this specialized area of study in the discipline of psychology. Main themes addressed in the course include diversity (e.g., how cultural traditions and standards influence things like social/gender roles and sexual conduct), critical thinking (e.g., how to make sense of the abundance of information about sexuality and gender presented by politicians, theologians, community leaders, radio, film, videos, TV, the Internet, and other sources), responsible sexual decision making and sexual health. These themes will surface throughout the course as the following topics are addressed: (1) what is human sexuality and how do we study it?; (2) female and male sexual function and response (anatomy and physiology); (3) gender identity and gender roles; (4) attraction and love; (5) relationships, intimacy and communication; (6) sexual orientation; (7) sexual dysfunctions and their treatments; (8) sexually transmitted infections; (9) atypical sexual variations; (10) sexual coercion; and (11) commercial sex. The course will address timely issues such as sexual harassment, interfaith couples, contraception, acquaintance sexual assault and the threat of AIDS.

350-270-LWPsychology and the Law

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

If you like legal issues, shows like CSI, Criminal Minds and Law and Order, you may well be interested by the topics we look at in this course. In this course, we look at the interface between law and psychology. Topics include Canadian laws and legal system, psycho-legal research, police investigations, memory and eyewitness testimony, jury selection and decision-making, sentencing and parole, competency to stand trial, criminal responsibility, violence and risk assessment, the use of children as witnesses, civil commitment and civil competence, the psychologist/psychiatrist as expert witness, pre-trial publicity, and ethics are also among topics that will explored.

350-285-LWAdvanced Topics in Psychology

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

In this course, students will explore selected topics in psychology at a more advanced level. Building upon the content of the Introduction to Psychology course, it will focus on using scientific thinking while addressing psychological issues. Current topics, events and cases will be used in order to help students apply psychological concepts, models and theories such as the biology of behavior (evolution, genetics, neuroscience), consciousness and free will, drugs, thinking, motivation, self-change, etc.

360-255-LWQuantitative Methods of Social Sciences II

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Social Sciences students wishing to pursue university studies in psychology need to complete the statistical background given them in Quantitative Methods (360-300-RE). This course provides those missing elements. Thus prepared, students will be able to better understand the concepts behind the statistics with which they will have to deal.

383-255-LWMicroeconomics

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Microeconomics builds on the notions of incentives, marginal analysis, demand, supply and markets first introduced in Macroeconomics (383-920-RE). Students will develop a deeper understanding of how markets work, why markets sometimes fail to ensure efficient resource use and what can be done about it, especially by government. In addition to studying the economic behaviour of firms and consumers, students will learn about elasticity, externalities, public goods, production costs, and competitive and non-competitive market structures. Students use the economic concepts and theories to analyse real-world examples mainly drawn from current events. This course is required for students in the Commerce Profile.

383-260-LWContemporary Economic Issues

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course shows students how economic analysis can enlighten societal understanding of a wide variety of issues and the possible solutions. Students apply basic economic concepts and theories to address questions regarding the economics of poverty and income redistribution, education, health care, the environment, labour markets, professional sports, immigration and discrimination. The effects of government policies on legal and illegal markets are also studied. For each theme in this course, students will begin by learning about the issues through available real-world data. They will learn how to use basic economic notions to deepen their understanding of these issues, economic myths and realities.

383-270-LWEnvironmental Economics

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Environmental Economics is a field of economics that undertakes theoretical or empirical studies of the effects of environmental policies on social welfare. Particular issues include air pollution, water quality, resources depletion, global warming, cost-benefit analysis, social efficiency, environmental policies, policy mechanism design, intergenerational equity and sustainable development. Throughout the course, students are introduced to the analytical tools required to design and evaluate public policies toward the environment. By the end of it, they will be able to data and theory to debate why they are for or against an environmental policy. They will also acknowledge the role of governments and collective choices as guardians of social welfare. In this sense, the course reconnects with the humanistic tradition of economics as a social science.

383-280-LWInternational Economic Relations

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course will enable students to understand and analyse the main characteristics of the contemporary international economic order. The course begins with an overview of the contradictory pressures towards globalisation and localisation and their consequences. Students develop a critical understanding of trade theories. They learn to use economic data to analyse and compare international trade patterns and the macroeconomic conditions including quality of life indicators in various countries by income group. Topics covered will include globalization, trade theory, trade liberalisation, protectionism, exchange rates, multinational corporations, the international monetary system, the roles of international organisations, and preferential trade agreements (e.g. NAFTA and the EU). This course is very useful to students who go to university programs in Economics, Business Administration, Political Science, International Studies, International Development and Law.

383-285-LWChallenges and Paths to Economic Development

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course focuses on the economics of sustainable, international development. Students will learn how to apply the main theories of development and underdevelopment to real-life situations. They will engage in a critical examination of the evolution of economic, political and social thought on economic development, notably the ways to improve the standard of living and to reduce global poverty. By examining case studies of countries with successful and unsuccessful development initiatives, students will acquire a critical appreciation of the diverse paths to development and the many challenges that countries face. Topics that will be covered usually include the following: 1.) the millennium development goals, measuring world poverty and progress toward poverty reduction: 2.) the roles of national and international institutions in development; 3.) international aid and its effectiveness; 4.) international trade and its effects on development; and 5.) the environmental impact of development.

385-280-LWInternational Relations

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

In this course, students learn to apply the key concepts, approaches and theories of international relations. The topics covered include the power structure of the international political system, the challenges of global interdependency, national interest and foreign policy, war and conflict resolution, the development of international law and justice, the role and function of international institutions such as the United Nations, and the rise of other political actors in global politics such as non-governmental organizations, international organizations and non-state actors including terrorist groups.

385-290-LWPolitics around the World

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course takes students on a guided tour of a selection of political systems. Students compare and contrast the political development, the institutions and the contemporary challenges facing democratic and non-democratic states from the developed and the developing world. The course will also help students develop their awareness of the different approaches to power-sharing between majority and minority groups in countries. Depending on the semesters, students will be invited to explore the politics of countries such as the United Kingdom, India, Canada, the USA, South Africa, Nigeria, Mexico, Brazil, Russia, China, and Iran.

385-295-LWHuman Rights in Law and Politics

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

Students develop a critical awareness of the normative, legal and political foundations of human rights in national and international affairs. Through the empirical study of human rights, students examine the current and past practice of human rights around the world as well as the various institutions (such as treaties, conventions, courts, tribunals) and groups that promote human rights. The rights of minorities, women, children, the disabled, and indigenous peoples will be examined. This course also covers violations of human rights (such as discrimination, state repression, and human trafficking) and how national and international actors measure, monitor and protect human rights. Students will use primary documents, secondary statistics, and secondary sources to analyze case studies, to evaluate UN country reports and to prepare their term project. They will learn where to locate pertinent information on human rights and how to use this information for complaints, alternative dispute resolution and advocacy.

387-255-LWSociology of Media and Popular Culture

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

We as social beings are consumers and producers of culture. In this course, you will have the opportunity to analyze culture, with particular emphasis on popular culture, and the impact it has on the individual and society at large. You will also learn about the social construction of reality and the various social messages the mass media communicates to people, such as its influence on gender roles and socialization, the construction of identity, and views on deviance and crime.

387-260-LWSociology of Contemporary Issues and Social Change

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

The focus of the course will be to analyze contemporary events and structural dimensions of the society in the light of sociological theories and perspectives. Students will be expected to follow events related to contemporary social issues in the media, with special emphasis on the electronic media. We will look closely at collective behaviour, the causes and processes of change, and competing ideologies of change.

387-265-LWSociology of Helping Professions

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

What makes people want to help others? Are you interested in working in a profession where you help other people? This course will enable you to learn about helping by studying philosophies about helping, health issues, medical sociology, social stratification and cultural competency. In other words, you will learn about helping in a profession, and you will also learn about the social reality of individuals who seek help.

387-280-LWSociology of Global Power and Communications

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

In this course you will learn about the various influences of globalization and the resulting impact on societies. Various topics include the following: the role of the mass media, the various forms of power, the role of powerful countries in international affairs and the social impact of multinational or transnational corporations. You will also study the link between sociology and human rights issues, environmental issues and social change.

401-255-LWAccounting I

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course provides the basis for all subsequent studies in accounting and finance. Students are introduced to the context of the accounting function, including its role, the importance of standard-setting, Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), ethics and career opportunities. Students learn to record information using a synoptic journal as well as a system of journals, ledgers and trial balances. The information to be recorded includes regular transactions, adjusting entries, closing entries, correcting entries and reversing entries. Approaches to documentation in the recording process are introduced. Students also learn to report information in standard financial statements for a proprietorship, including a balance sheet, income statement and statement of owner's equity. The course includes an introduction to the drafting of notes to financial statements. Students have an opportunity to record and report information using an accounting software package, and they are exposed to the process of system modification. The course also introduces the interpretation of financial information using ratio analysis.

401-260-LWMarketing

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course situates marketing in its broader context as a link between external customers and the various functions of a business. Students learn how to segment and select markets, develop an appropriate "marketing mix" (combining product, price, place and promotion) and apply marketing knowledge to better understand and serve customers. Special emphasis is placed on supporting customer service, sales and marketing research activities. Students also have an opportunity to consider ethical aspects of marketing, the context of globalization and opportunities arising from technologies.

401-265-LWBusiness Law

Hours: 45

Weighting: 2-1-3

This course deals with the legal aspects of commercial activities affected by provincial and federal legislation and regulations. The areas covered include business ownership, contracts, civil liability, successions, bankruptcy and insolvency. Students learn how to find and consult relevant legal information, identify and apply pertinent legal principles and recognize the consequences of not respecting legal responsibilities.